Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

Sicilian Moose Roast (That’s right, a MOOSE roast)


To Be Honest, this was my first time cooking moose. As I am originally from the big city of Toronto, I was never given such a meal changing ingredient as moose before. Since moving to Northern Canada, I can honestly say my palate has been challenged. With friends and family who hunt the wilds of Northern Canada, I have the pleasure of trying these new things. So, when I was handed a grocery bag full of moose meat I was lost with what to do with it. That was until I was told, “Cook it in tomato sauce, it takes the wild out of the meat”.

Tomato sauce… I thought; finding my mind jumping back to the years my dad cooked Sicilian roast beef at home. It was then I knew what I was going to make.

This Sicilian Moose Roast is an adaptation of my father’s recipe. It turned out to be incredibly delicious and the meat didn’t taste anything like moose. It was tender and flavorful, just the way a Sicilian roast is supposed to be. With that, I’ll leave you to the recipe. Enjoy!

Prep: 5-10 mins                Cook time: 1 hr 30 mins                Total time: 1 hr 40-45 mins


1 can tomato paste

1 can diced tomatoes

1/2 tsp parsley

1/2 tsp oregano

1/2 tsp basil

1/2 tsp black pepper

1/2 tsp sea salt

2 bay leaves

2 tbs olive oil

1 cup diced onion (white)

2 cloves of minced garlic

1/2 cup water

1/2-1 pound moose roast or moose loin (can also be beef or pork)

Pasta (strands or noodles)

Items you’ll need:

Dutch oven





Set oven to 350 F. In a Dutch oven place meat, tomato paste, diced tomatoes, spice mix, water, garlic and olive oil. Mix with spatula and make sure all meat is well covered by the sauce. Cover and place in over for 30 mins.P1020345

A 30 mins remove from oven and mix sauce. You should also flip the meat and recover it with the sauce. Place lid back onto the Dutch oven and put back into the oven for another 30 mins.

At that 30 mins mark you are to repeat the above instructions: stir, flip, cover. Place the Dutch oven back into the oven for another 30 mins.

This would be a good time to boil some water and cook your pasta.

Once the 30 mins are up, remove from oven and let sit for 5 mins. Put pasta on the plate, add sauce and meat. There you have it.

Makes: Depends on the meat. This recipe made 3-4 plates.

Update: Website Changes and More

Hello World Out There World!

So, right now my count for Inkitt is at 70 downloads remaining – since I promised to keep you up-to-date about the situation.

Another fun thing I want to share with you is the fact I’m getting to work more on my P6 official website. If you are interested in learning more about the world of Prophecy Six and reading about the history of the world this is the place you should check out. I’ll link to the latest update HERE!

Anyways, that is all I have to say for now. I will probably have more to share with you once I get all the beta reading back. Hope you all have a wonderful weekend, remember to stay safe, be creative and until next time – toodles!🙂

OLD WORD FRIDAY: Ossifragant

Hello World Out There World!

This weeks OWF is ossifragant, which is a adjective founded around 1656.

The word ossifragant means, ‘bone-breaking’.

How you pronounce the word is:


Examples of using ossifragant in a sentence:

She heard the ossifragant noise of her hand when the shelf felt on top of her.


He was known for his ossifragant blow.

Should this word come back?

Nope. I think this word should stay dead as the word ossifragant doesn’t have the same gut wrenching feeling as bone-breaking. Unless you have a character that uses big words that no one is meant to comprehend, then don’t use this word. It is hard to set in a sentence without it sounding strange and it isn’t a word that is easy to read. If you are saying ossifragant in regular, everyday conversation no one is going to get what you’re saying and you’ll probably end up having to explain it – losing the whole feeling for what you are trying to say. I’m not going to lie, I find this word sounds pretty but bone-breaking isn’t supposed to sound pretty or poetic… so the word in my opinion doesn’t work with what it means. At the end of the day this word died for a reason and should stay buried.

Thinking Thursdays: Avoiding Alliteration

Hello World Out There World!

If you have followed me for a while you will know that I love using alliteration. For those of you not in the know, alliteration is:

Thanks Google!🙂

Examples of alliteration would be this segment (Thinking Thursdays) or even the title for the post (Avoiding Alliteration). There are many people (writers mostly) who say that real writers don’t use alliteration. That is it lazy, not creative, and annoying. I don’t know why that is… I mean if Marvel uses alliteration it must been good, right?

When it comes to how I use alliteration I usually use it to emphasize something in a sentence, or draw a readers attention to certain details. Alliteration helps a reader recall a certain moment in the book later on, or connects a certain thing with a character. I also use alliteration to help with the flow of a sentence or cut down on unwanted word usage to get my point across.

Alliteration is a useful tool for a writer, just like the word said. Both forms are told to be ignored or removed but in small amounts they can help a story flow.

I love how people keep insisting that there are rules to writing… but in the end they are only guidelines to help you get started. In the end you will write the way you want with witty alliteration anyways.

But this is Thinking Thursday, so, I want to know what you think. Should writers avoid alliteration? Why or why not? Leave your answers in the comments below and until next time – toodles! o^.^o

Dialogue Prompt: Disguise Themselves


“Mean people don’t bother me,” she rinsed her hands, flicking away the water before patting them dry on the front of her dress. “What bothers me are the ones that disguise themselves as nice.”

She glared across the room at the man leering at the injured men scattered across the temple she had turned into a makeshift infirmary. He pretended to care but would have order them all executed so not to waste his time if she wasn’t there to intervene.

Simple Baked Pumpkin Offspring (Seeds)


‘Tis the season to disembowel the genus Cucurbita and bake its insides into pies. I am not going to cover pumpkin pie in this post though, the focus is on the other awesome thing pumpkins offer us. SEEDS! Yummy, yummy seeds. ^.^

Prep time: 10 mins                          Cook time: 45 mins                Total: 55 mins


One pumpkin

1-2 tablespoons Olive oil

1-2 teaspoons (or to taste) of Salt

Baking Sheet



De-gut your pumpkin and put the seeds in a bowl. Soak seeds in water, making sure to move the seeds around to get the extra guts off the seeds.yumseeds

You may have to repeat the soaking process three times until seeds are clean.

Dry seeds with paper towel and put in a dry bowl. Add salt and olive oil. Stir to coat all the seeds and spread them onto baking sheet.

Turn oven on to 300F (150C) degrees.

Put baking sheet into over and set timer for 22 mins.

When time goes, moved the seeds around the baking sheet before putting them back in for another 23 mins.

After those 23 mins are done take out, let cool and enjoy.🙂

Old Word Friday: NOSCIBLE

Today’s Old Word Friday is noscible.

Noscible is an adjective that was used mostly around 1654. The word isn’t as noscible as it was back then and so that’s why it finds itself on this list of forgettable old words.

If you haven’t guess the meaning of the word from the last sentence noscible pretty much means ‘knowable or something well-known’. Now that previous sentence probably makes a lot more sense.

How to pronounce the word:


Should this word come back?

I think so. It is a good word and I love how it sounds in sentences. Noscible, when used correctly, sounds like the word you are wanting to use. It also has a similar sound to noticeable… which is possibly why this word would work in modern conversation. I know I’ll be trying to use it in my regular conversations from now on… but I think by now people expect me to have a old style vocabulary.😄

Quote: When you become the image


I love this quote. If I could sum up book two in one quote I think this would be it. Liora is fighting against everyone telling her how she has to act more like a girl. Cael is being pressed to focus more on becoming a warrior and the new six is being tormented for being the person she knows she wants to be. Book two is pretty much becoming the people they see themselves as, and realizing that the only people with the rights to tell you how to be is you.

Anyways, I found this quote really inspiring and had to share it.

Until next time – toodles!

Thinking Thursdays: Research & Writing

Hello World Out There World!
This week I’m tackling the question: How important is research to you when writing a book?
I went into some little detail regarding this question on my author interview with Serious Reading a while back but I thought I’d dive in deeper. So, here we go!

Depending on the topic I could spend 10 minutes to 10 weeks researching. When it comes to my blog posts, most of what I write is opinion based and therefore doesn’t have a lot of facts required. Not saying what I’m writing on my blogs I didn’t research… it is just what I’ve written on here is my formulated opinion on the things I’ve read online or formed after having conversations with others interested in these topics.

What I usually spend time researching is what I’ll be using in my books. I want to be able to share correct information with my readers… as I believe if I am going to have people read my work it should be close to accurate as possible. People learn from reading and I don’t want to be sharing the wrong information. At the same time, I am no close to being an expert as Trump is at being a good President. I do not claim to know all the science behind natural health practices. I do not claim to be an expert in medieval history or military tactics. I’ve read books, I’ve made notes and those notes I use in my work. At the same time, I have to trust that the information that I’ve read is correct. For all I know the six books I’ve read could be a creation of someones opinion and not based in fact at all.

That’s one reason why I love writing fictions because as much as I may have truth weaved between the words my writing doesn’t have to be taken as truth. I could include actual ointment recipes or how to make your own tea within the pages of my book but at the same time not be taken completely seriously because of the fact my characters ride magical creatures and shoot lightening bolts from their fingertips, (all right maybe not lightening bolts… but you get the point).

Research is important. Most writers understand and know this. Most writers want to come across as competent in their craft and at times fear about being corrected or called a hack for not getting something right in their books. I know I have the fear and that is why I spend the time exploring the subjects I include in my books I’m not familiar with like naturopathy, botany, and medieval combat. As much as my world is based in fantasy it is my research that helps ground my readers in some kind of twisted, relatable reality.

Am I the only one to think this or are there some writers out there that feel the same way? Am I doing too much research or is this common for writers to feel this way? I’d like to know your opinion on this matter, so don’t be afraid to leave a comment in the area below.
Remember stay safe, be creative and until next time – Toodles! o^.^o





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