Hello world out there world!

Welcome back to Old World Friday! This week I have two words to share with you… and both happen to be quite the mouthful.

So, let’s get started.

This first word we are going to work with is fallaciloquence.

Pronounced: fall-a-cil-o-quence

You probably can figure out why that word has disappeared as it isn’t the easiest one to pronounce or the easiest one to fit into sentences but HEY! We can try, right?

Fallaciloquence is a noun that was believed to have been created around 1656 and was used commonly up to around 1761. The word means deceitful or false speech – which is short to write or say that than to put fallaciloquence… but that’s besirdes the point.

It is one of those fancy words that may help you sound smarter… or possibly make a character you wish to be smart sound snobbish or disconnected to common word uses.

Two sentences I came up with to use this word are:

Despite his popularity the presidential candidate was known for his fallaciloquence.

Or…

No one should trust a person with fallociloquence.

The second word I will be sharing with you today isn’t are hard to use in a sentence as fallaciloquence. This word is also a noun thought of have been created around 1459 and lessened in popularity around 1706. The word is gardeviance.

Pronounced: gar – deviance

What is a gardeviance? It is a fancier name for a chest you keep valuables in or clothing in. It is also another word for travelling trunk.

Some suggestions on where to use this word in your writing would be in a fantasy story with a foot in medieval history. Or a historical fiction of some sort based in the time when that word was more commonly used. If you have a time travelling character or an immortal character they could use that word as well.

Two examples of using this word in a sentence are:

Mother kept all my baby clothes in the oak gardeviance in our living room.

Or…

I love going to antique stores and seeing the large assortment of gardeviances.

Out of these two words I would find myself using gardeviance more than fallaciloquence as most of what I write is YA fantasy with medieval details. That doesn’t mean I won’t use both words eventually, I just find that gardeviance is an easier word to use than the mouthful that was the first word we covered.

Do I hope for these words to make a comeback?

No, unlike other words I’ve approached in the past these words would not suit modern day conversation unless you wish to set a bad precedence with being known as a snob. The words would work in conversation with other word lovers but not with strangers at a bus stop.

And until next time – toodles!!