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Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

Month

October 2016

It Is Halloween!!

 

Hello World Out There World!!
As this is my favourite day of the year I thought I’d share one of my favourite Halloween songs – This Is Halloween from Tim Burton’s Nightmare Before Christmas:
Wishing all of you a safe, spooky, and fun Halloween!

And yes… That pumpkin face in the picture above is my Jack-o-lantern this year. 

 

Mother Knows Best Chicken Soup (Great for Cold Season)

chickensoup

The Title pretty much sums up the reason behind this soup. Whenever I was sick, it was my mother who made it for me. She knew what would make me feel better, she knew what was best for me. Her soup was made with love, and you could taste it in every spoonful. It warmed you from the inside to the outside. That fogginess in your head would melt away, your stuffed nose would clear, and your scratchy throat would finally be soothed. It brought life back into a living corpse and still to this day it works its miracles.

I not only share this soup recipe with you because I know it works, but to also share something that makes memories.

Prep: 10-20 mins                                   Cook time: 2.5 hrs                                      Total time: 3 hrs

Ingredients:

1 whole soup chicken

6 carrots (Peeled)

Half a white onion

1 small bag of baby potatoes or 4 large potatoes

6 stalks of celery

2-3 cloves of garlic (minced)

1/2 tsp pepper

1 Pinch of salt

16-18 cups of water

1 Can of corn (OPTIONAL)

1 Can of peas (OPTIONAL)

Items you’ll need:

Soup pot

Glass bowl

Knife and cutting board

Stove or hot plate

Measuring cup

Measure spoon

Mixing spoon

Instructions:

You will need to fill the soup pot with 16-18 cups of water. Clean the chicken and place in pot, and turn stove on to start cooking the soup. Finely chop 1 stalk of celery, 1 carrot (skin carrot), half an onion, and 1 potato (scrub potato and leave on skin). Add the finely chopped ingredients to the water, along with minced garlic, salt and pepper. While the chicken is cooking chop the remaining celery, potatoes, and carrots into fair sized pieces. Stir soup and leave to boil for 1.5 hours or until chicken is cooked.

After 1.5 hours or the chicken is cooked, you will remove chicken from the pot and place in glass bowl. Once chicken is removed add the chopped vegetables to the boiling water and give them a stir. Set the timer for 1 hour.

Allow the chicken to cool before removing skin, bones and fat from the chicken. Only add the meat back to the soup when there is a 1/2 hour left to the soup. Stir and wait until timer goes.

Turn off the stove and remove from burner. Let the soup cool for 10 minutes before serving.

OPTIONAL:

Sometimes I add a can of peas and a can of corn to my soup. This gives the soup a sweet taste and adds more gumption to the soup. If you are going to add a can of peas or corn to the soup, I would suggest waiting for the timer to have 10 minutes remaining before adding them. This prevents them from becoming mushy.

Makes:

This makes around 6-7 bowls of soup and keeps in the fridge for 4-5 days. Freezes well and makes a great meals for when you don’t feel like booking.

Old Word Friday: Privign

Hello World Out There World!

This weeks old word is privign. Now, this word is a noun that was used mostly between 1605 all the way to 1654. Privign is a fancier way of saying stepson… why they had to make a fancier term for stepson I don’t know but that’s what this weeks word means.

How to pronounce this weeks word:

PRI-VINE

Examples of using privign in a sentence:

He was looking forward to gaining a privign after he married the love of his life.

Or…

The woman was known to not be so kind to her privign.

Or…

Their privign was treated more like a housekeeper than one of their children.

Should this would be brought back?

I think if you are writing historical fiction or getting together with your steampunk buddies for an adventure around town this word would make more sense to use… but to use it in common, everyday conversation – no. Like many of the words I do in this segment privign is a fun word to say but it’s one that would take more explaining than it would to just say stepson. This doesn’t mean I won’t use it but I doubt it is going to make a comeback. 🙂

Thinking Thursdays: I read your book…

To me… that is the most horrifying and yet more exciting words in my life right now. Horrifying because I have no idea what they think about my book. Exciting because, hey – someone read my book!

It is even worse when it is someone you are working with because you will see them day in
and day out, thinking what they thought of your book. If they read your book and told younotsureifenjoyed that they enjoyed it you find yourself thinking, “did they really enjoy it or are they just being nice?” I mean, they have no reason to lie to you but at the same time maybe they are just being nice because they are going to see you everyday and don’t want you being reminded that they are the person that hates your book. At the same time you may get those readers that talk to you about your book but talk in such a way that you don’t know if they enjoyed it or not. They compliment the book but fit in suggestions on where it could have been better… avoiding stating what their opinion is about your work and leaving you trying to decode their words.

Maybe it is the socially awkward introvert in me? Maybe I’m not giving myself enough credit because I can see every time I re-read my work where I can improve? I don’t know… but I shouldn’t be focusing on the negative. If anything, I should be focusing on the fact that I got one more person outside of my family and friends to read my book. This is one more person that can suggest to other people who are looking for something to read to read my book.

Don’t get me wrong – I enjoy hearing people say those words. I’m excited to hear what people thought or where I can improve in the next book. There is a sense of completion that comes when you hear those words and it sinks in every time some says those words that you actually wrote a book people are reading.

I don’t know… am I alone with this or do others feel the same way? Let me know in the comments below! 🙂

Sicilian Moose Roast (That’s right, a MOOSE roast)

picpasta

To Be Honest, this was my first time cooking moose. As I am originally from the big city of Toronto, I was never given such a meal changing ingredient as moose before. Since moving to Northern Canada, I can honestly say my palate has been challenged. With friends and family who hunt the wilds of Northern Canada, I have the pleasure of trying these new things. So, when I was handed a grocery bag full of moose meat I was lost with what to do with it. That was until I was told, “Cook it in tomato sauce, it takes the wild out of the meat”.

Tomato sauce… I thought; finding my mind jumping back to the years my dad cooked Sicilian roast beef at home. It was then I knew what I was going to make.

This Sicilian Moose Roast is an adaptation of my father’s recipe. It turned out to be incredibly delicious and the meat didn’t taste anything like moose. It was tender and flavorful, just the way a Sicilian roast is supposed to be. With that, I’ll leave you to the recipe. Enjoy!

Prep: 5-10 mins                Cook time: 1 hr 30 mins                Total time: 1 hr 40-45 mins

Ingredients:

1 can tomato paste

1 can diced tomatoes

1/2 tsp parsley

1/2 tsp oregano

1/2 tsp basil

1/2 tsp black pepper

1/2 tsp sea salt

2 bay leaves

2 tbs olive oil

1 cup diced onion (white)

2 cloves of minced garlic

1/2 cup water

1/2-1 pound moose roast or moose loin (can also be beef or pork)

Pasta (strands or noodles)

Items you’ll need:

Dutch oven

Knife

Spatula

Oven

Instructions:

Set oven to 350 F. In a Dutch oven place meat, tomato paste, diced tomatoes, spice mix, water, garlic and olive oil. Mix with spatula and make sure all meat is well covered by the sauce. Cover and place in over for 30 mins.P1020345

A 30 mins remove from oven and mix sauce. You should also flip the meat and recover it with the sauce. Place lid back onto the Dutch oven and put back into the oven for another 30 mins.

At that 30 mins mark you are to repeat the above instructions: stir, flip, cover. Place the Dutch oven back into the oven for another 30 mins.

This would be a good time to boil some water and cook your pasta.

Once the 30 mins are up, remove from oven and let sit for 5 mins. Put pasta on the plate, add sauce and meat. There you have it.

Makes: Depends on the meat. This recipe made 3-4 plates.

Update: Website Changes and More

Hello World Out There World!

So, right now my count for Inkitt is at 70 downloads remaining – since I promised to keep you up-to-date about the situation.

Another fun thing I want to share with you is the fact I’m getting to work more on my P6 official website. If you are interested in learning more about the world of Prophecy Six and reading about the history of the world this is the place you should check out. I’ll link to the latest update HERE!

Anyways, that is all I have to say for now. I will probably have more to share with you once I get all the beta reading back. Hope you all have a wonderful weekend, remember to stay safe, be creative and until next time – toodles! 🙂

OLD WORD FRIDAY: Ossifragant

Hello World Out There World!

This weeks OWF is ossifragant, which is a adjective founded around 1656.

The word ossifragant means, ‘bone-breaking’.

How you pronounce the word is:

O – SIF -RAG -ANT

Examples of using ossifragant in a sentence:

She heard the ossifragant noise of her hand when the shelf felt on top of her.

Or…

He was known for his ossifragant blow.

Should this word come back?

Nope. I think this word should stay dead as the word ossifragant doesn’t have the same gut wrenching feeling as bone-breaking. Unless you have a character that uses big words that no one is meant to comprehend, then don’t use this word. It is hard to set in a sentence without it sounding strange and it isn’t a word that is easy to read. If you are saying ossifragant in regular, everyday conversation no one is going to get what you’re saying and you’ll probably end up having to explain it – losing the whole feeling for what you are trying to say. I’m not going to lie, I find this word sounds pretty but bone-breaking isn’t supposed to sound pretty or poetic… so the word in my opinion doesn’t work with what it means. At the end of the day this word died for a reason and should stay buried.

Thinking Thursdays: Avoiding Alliteration

Hello World Out There World!

If you have followed me for a while you will know that I love using alliteration. For those of you not in the know, alliteration is:

alliteration
Thanks Google! 🙂

Examples of alliteration would be this segment (Thinking Thursdays) or even the title for the post (Avoiding Alliteration). There are many people (writers mostly) who say that real writers don’t use alliteration. That is it lazy, not creative, and annoying. I don’t know why that is… I mean if Marvel uses alliteration it must been good, right?

When it comes to how I use alliteration I usually use it to emphasize something in a sentence, or draw a readers attention to certain details. Alliteration helps a reader recall a certain moment in the book later on, or connects a certain thing with a character. I also use alliteration to help with the flow of a sentence or cut down on unwanted word usage to get my point across.

Alliteration is a useful tool for a writer, just like the word said. Both forms are told to be ignored or removed but in small amounts they can help a story flow.

I love how people keep insisting that there are rules to writing… but in the end they are only guidelines to help you get started. In the end you will write the way you want with witty alliteration anyways.

But this is Thinking Thursday, so, I want to know what you think. Should writers avoid alliteration? Why or why not? Leave your answers in the comments below and until next time – toodles! o^.^o

Dialogue Prompt: Disguise Themselves

disguisethemselves

“Mean people don’t bother me,” she rinsed her hands, flicking away the water before patting them dry on the front of her dress. “What bothers me are the ones that disguise themselves as nice.”

She glared across the room at the man leering at the injured men scattered across the temple she had turned into a makeshift infirmary. He pretended to care but would have order them all executed so not to waste his time if she wasn’t there to intervene.

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