Hello World!

So this Old Word Friday is going to focus on the old words I mixed into my new book Children of Sirphan, which is going to be released in 4 days (December 20th). I thought it would be appropriate to bring back some old words that I shared back at the beginning of the Old Word Friday series and they just so happen to be in use throughout my most recent book. So, without any further delay here we go!

Mullock

This word is a noun which means rubbish or nonsense. The word mullock is still popular in places like Australia and many of you would likely have heard the word mullarkey or malarkey – which is the modernized and more popular term deriving from mullock.

How do you pronounce mullock?

MUL – LUCK

How to use this word in a sentence:

“Well… you have done some unexplainable things that were explained by that mullock…” Caldor huffed.

Or…

He only hoped his colleagues wouldn’t denounce him for believing such mullock.

Should mullock make a comeback?

In a sense it already has with the term mullarkey or malarkey being so popular in other parts of the world. Mullock, though, is a word I use on a regular bases and have used in my books. I would like to see more people welcoming the word into their vocabulary but I do not know if that is going to happen anytime soon.

 

Twirlblast

Twirlblast is a noun which is another name given to a tornado or wind funnel. I chose to share this word originally because I like how it sounded and thought it funny that tornado had replaced such a silly sounding word.

How do you pronounce twirlblast?

TWIRL – BLAST

How is twirlblast used in a sentence?

“It looks like a twirlblast came through here,” Liora sighed as the old sage spun around to face her.

Or…

“Hey yoou…” Cáel strained to use the common word, while keeping a calm tone of voice. He avoided stepping on the books that lined the floor like pop pots. He didn’t need her turning her anger towards him. “Looks like a twirlblast came tearin’ through here, eh?”

Should twirlblast make a comeback?

I think it would be a fun word to know but wouldn’t be a popular word to use. I only say that because the word twirlblast sounds like your downplaying the dangers of what a tornado can do. A twirlblast sounds like a blast of hot air in the summer not a spinning funnel of destruction.

 

Nibling

An oldie but still one of my favourites. Nibling means niece or nephew. They are your siblings offspring, therefore making them your niblings. I like this word because it combines two words (niece and nephew) in to one gender neutral word (nibling). It is also very fun to say.

How do you pronounce nibling?

NIB – LING

How do you use nibling in a sentence?

“No, Li, I need yah here to help Marcia,” Foe smiled, “her family will be visitin’ and yah’ll get to meet me niblings, who I’m sure yah’ll love.”

Or…

Revris is Rebin’s nibling.

Should nibling make a comeback?

Why not? It is a fun word. It simplifies things… and there was already a movement at a school in the UK that wanted to bring nibling back. If the children are wanting to use the word I don’t see why we shouldn’t bring this word back into the normal rotation of verbal conversation.

 

So there are just the three most used OLD WORDS I used in my most recent book – Children of Sirphan! Keep your eyes open closer to December 20th to find out where you can get your copy of this wildly popular young adult fantasy. Until next time be creative, stay safe, and as always Toodles! ^.^