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Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

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Old Word Friday: Resarciate

Hello World Out There World!

This week on OWF I bring you resarciate. This word was created around the 1656 and reached pique popularity one year later in 1657. I’m sure this word is used today, not saying that any of the words I have posted thus far aren’t in use, but it isn’t commonly used or used in popularity. Hence it being on the OWF posts.

Now, that that is out of my system let’s learn a little more about the word resarciate. The word is a verb (action, state, or occurrence) and means ‘to mend or to make amends’.

How do you pronounce resarciate?

RE-SAR-SEE-ATE

Examples of this word in a sentence:

I want to resarciate my problems before they get too far out of hand.

Or…

My sister wants to resarciate her relationship before it’s too late.

Or…

My mother told me it was better to resarciate then let things fester.

Should this word make a come back?

When it comes to the word resarciate I could see it being used in a more educational setting, like in schools – specifically a private school setting. I could also see this word being popular in more European countries but not in North America. The word sounds like something those in a higher institution would be using to discuss politics. I do like the word and will likely use it in my future books but in everyday conversation with a stranger on the street I’ll continue to use the words that make up its definition.

Old Word Friday: Quibble & Quibbleism

Hello World Out There World!

This week’s old word forgotten by history is quibbleism. Now, before I explain to you what this word is I’ll have to explain to you what quibble is. Quibble is the act of arguing or raising objections to something. It is a verb and you would have likely hear this word in literature during 1830-1900. Quibbleism is a noun that means ‘the practice of quibbling’. This word was used during 1836 and died off around the beginnings of the 1900s.

How are these words pronounced:

KWI – BELL

KWI-BELL-IS-MM

Examples of these words in a sentence:

The old man liked to quibble with his neighbours.

Or…

There is always a lot of quibbling going on at the courthouse.

Or…

The young lawyer’s quibbleism earned his client a retrial.

Should this word make a comeback?

Asides from it being a fun word to say I don’t think it would make a return to the common language use of today. If someone is writing a book based around 1800-1900 then it would make sense to use this word. A writer may even find the word useful if they are trying to portray a Sherlock Holmes type character. In the end, I do not see this word returning but that isn’t going to stop me from using it. 🙂

Old Word Friday: MISQUEME

Hello World Out There World!

This week on OWF we are tackling a verb that was created around 1395 and lasted until 1658. This word lasted longer than the others I’ve shared with you all on my other posts and that might be because of what this word means.

Misqueme means to displease or to offend someone. This is a great word to use as there is an election coming up and this word will be a great replacement for the other rhetoric that has blown up on all the social media sites.

This weeks word is pronounced:

MIS – QUE – ME

Some examples of using this word in sentences are:

When Trump opens his mouth it is only a matter of time before he misquemes someone.

Or…

Hillary’s email scandal misquemed a lot of her supporters.

Or…

A lot of us are misqueme they don’t have another candidate to vote for.

Conclusion:

Do I want this word to come back? Sure, I can see it being a useful word. I also think it would add a new word to the rhetoric that we are hearing around the US election. I also like how it sounds when you say it, it is a very catchy word.

Old Word Friday: Labascate

Hello World Out There World!

Old Word Friday is brought to you by LABASCATE. Don’t just fall like any regular pleb – labascate instead. 🙂

Pronouncing this weeks word:

LAB – A – SKATE

 

All right, so this weeks word is a verb and was believed to be used mostly around 1727. It didn’t gain in any popularity and quickly became unpopular around the same time.

Here are some ways to use this word in a sentence:

The dog labascated down the stairs.

Or…

In the winter we love to labascate down the hill in the backyard.

Or…

I’m afraid the car will labascate in these road conditions.

The word labascate means to “start falling or sliding”. I honestly think it would be easier to say fall or slide instead of an elaborate word like labascate but some people like to use fancy words like that. This word would work best with a intellectual character like Sherlock Holmes or for a time period set between the end of the Renaissance to the middle of the Victorian era. Really it is up to you if you want to use this word or not, but it does sound sophisticated.

 

I love English and I also Hate it!

Hello World Out There World!

Was exploring Facebook the other day when I came across this interesting post:

onlyhimlove

I love finding things like this. It not only shows you how awesome the English language is but also how horribly nightmarish you can be. Now, for those who don’t have the time to make up these sentences – don’t worry I’ve got you covered:

onlylove.jpg

Is there anyone else that thinks this is just amazing? Let me know in the comments below and until next time – toodles! :3

Old Word Friday: Kexy

Hello World Out There World!

Now, this weeks word I could see making a comeback. It could even become as popular as the word bae. Bae by the way did not originally mean what it means today. Bae originated as a Danish word for poop… it does not mean baby or babe. So, the next time you text your loved one “ur my bae!” remember you just called them your poop.

Anyways, now that I ruined that for all of you…

This weeks old word is an adjective and originated around 1608 lasting until 1884. The word kexy means something dry, brittle, or withered.

Pronouncing the word:

KEX – EE

Some examples of this word in a sentence word be:

My brother’s cooking always turns out kexy.

Or…

These potato chips are really kexy.

Or… (Just because this is now stuck in my head)

I’m kexy and I know it. XD

Do you think this is going to make a comeback?

Probably… but not in a way it was originally intended. I think the word kexy will come back as a portmanteau (two words fused into one) for the words kinky and sexy. I would want it to make a comeback for it’s original definition, and I’ll probably end up as that weird person at a party using the word while all the other kids look at me like I’ve come from another planet. I honestly do not know if they word will make a comeback at all, it is a fun word to say and I can see it confusing a lot of people when it is used but like all the other words I talk about it will probably not make a comeback. 🙂

What do you think? How would you use the word KEXY?

 

Old Word Friday: Jobler

Hello World Out There World!

This weeks old word Friday is jobler. Jobler is a noun believed to have been created around 1662 and didn’t grow in popularity after that. This weeks word means ‘someone who works small jobs’.

Pronunciation of this word is:

job-ler

Examples of using this word in a sentence are:

If you can’t find full-time work than become a jobler.

Or…

I met a nice gentleman the other day who’s a wonderful jobler.

I like the word jobler. It is easy and fun to say, which is usually the reasons behind why I want certain words to come back into common use – like nibling. If used in common conversation jobler may confuse some people but the word has job in it… so it is possible that those you say the word to will pick up on what it could mean. I would love to have this word make a comeback, but only time will tell. :3

Old Word Friday: Deartuate

Hello world out there world!!

Many of you know my favourite word is bludgeon. It is such a fantastic word and comes across well as a violent word when it needs to be. I love the sound of it and the history behind it… well today’s word is something similar.

Deartuate is a verb that was created during the years 1623-1653. It was commonly used during this time. To deartuate someone is to dismember them. Again a violent word but I just find this bloody fantastic. (Pun not intended).

So how do you use deartuate in a sentence:

The murderer deartuated the body so no one could identify it with ease.

Or…

To deartuate or to not deartuate – that is the question.

This is a word that can be easier to use in a sentence than last weeks OWF. I can definitely see myself using this word in my future books, since the more the book series goes on the likelihood I will need creative terms asides from bludgeon to use in certain scenes. This is a word I want to make a comeback. Not because I like it… well that is one reason… but because it is a word that sounds as violent as what it means.

Until next week – toodles everyone!

 

 

Old Word Friday: Cacozealous

This weeks OWF is cacozealous. This adjective was created and mostly used between 1656-1696. The word means to imitate badly or something that is poorly affected.

Examples of this word in a sentence are:

The student’s cacozealous attempt of impersonating their teacher was in terrible taste.

Or…

They were cacozealous by the bad weather.

….

I understand how this word could have faded away over the years. It is awkward to use in sentences and has a hard time working in conjunction with other words. I would suggest using this word in a minimal way, or to spice up a sentence instead of using imitated badly or poorly affected. This is one word though, I would like not want to see make a come back.

 

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