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Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

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forgotten word

Old Word Friday: Privign

Hello World Out There World!

This weeks old word is privign. Now, this word is a noun that was used mostly between 1605 all the way to 1654. Privign is a fancier way of saying stepson… why they had to make a fancier term for stepson I don’t know but that’s what this weeks word means.

How to pronounce this weeks word:

PRI-VINE

Examples of using privign in a sentence:

He was looking forward to gaining a privign after he married the love of his life.

Or…

The woman was known to not be so kind to her privign.

Or…

Their privign was treated more like a housekeeper than one of their children.

Should this would be brought back?

I think if you are writing historical fiction or getting together with your steampunk buddies for an adventure around town this word would make more sense to use… but to use it in common, everyday conversation – no. Like many of the words I do in this segment privign is a fun word to say but it’s one that would take more explaining than it would to just say stepson. This doesn’t mean I won’t use it but I doubt it is going to make a comeback. 🙂

Old Word Friday: MISQUEME

Hello World Out There World!

This week on OWF we are tackling a verb that was created around 1395 and lasted until 1658. This word lasted longer than the others I’ve shared with you all on my other posts and that might be because of what this word means.

Misqueme means to displease or to offend someone. This is a great word to use as there is an election coming up and this word will be a great replacement for the other rhetoric that has blown up on all the social media sites.

This weeks word is pronounced:

MIS – QUE – ME

Some examples of using this word in sentences are:

When Trump opens his mouth it is only a matter of time before he misquemes someone.

Or…

Hillary’s email scandal misquemed a lot of her supporters.

Or…

A lot of us are misqueme they don’t have another candidate to vote for.

Conclusion:

Do I want this word to come back? Sure, I can see it being a useful word. I also think it would add a new word to the rhetoric that we are hearing around the US election. I also like how it sounds when you say it, it is a very catchy word.

Old Word Friday: Jobler

Hello World Out There World!

This weeks old word Friday is jobler. Jobler is a noun believed to have been created around 1662 and didn’t grow in popularity after that. This weeks word means ‘someone who works small jobs’.

Pronunciation of this word is:

job-ler

Examples of using this word in a sentence are:

If you can’t find full-time work than become a jobler.

Or…

I met a nice gentleman the other day who’s a wonderful jobler.

I like the word jobler. It is easy and fun to say, which is usually the reasons behind why I want certain words to come back into common use – like nibling. If used in common conversation jobler may confuse some people but the word has job in it… so it is possible that those you say the word to will pick up on what it could mean. I would love to have this word make a comeback, but only time will tell. :3

Old Word Friday: Acrasial

 

That’s right!

After a long break OWF (Old Word Friday) has returned. I needed to build back up my old work list and do some research so I could share them with the world. I’m so happy to be getting back to the roots of this blog since OWF is one of the original posts I did on a weekly bases since this place started.

So, without further ado I give you this week’s old word: ACRASIAL

Acrasial is an adjective believed to have been created in 1851. It was believed to be first used by the American novelist Sylvester Judd who lived from 1813-1853 in Westhampton, Massachusetts.

The word means ill-regulated or ill-tempered.

For example:

Robert Baratheon was an acrasial king.

Or…

The acrasial teacher was known to throw desks at his students.

The use of acrasial can be found in a lot of older books but is a term rarely used in modern works. I love this word because I love interesting adjectives that are forgotten by time.

Question of the day:

Have you heard or read the word acrasial before? If so where?

 

Old Word Friday: Fudgel

 

Fudgel is the act of appearing to do work when really you aren’t doing anything at all. I think many of us can agree… this is the perfect word for a Friday since no one really wants to do anything before the weekend.

Ways to uses fudgel in a sentence:

All I did was fudgel all day long.

Or…

The boss noticed his new employee fudgeling at his desk.

 

Fudgel         Fudgeling       Fudgeler

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