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Prophecy Six Blog

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fun words

Old Word Friday: Words Found in Children of Sirphan

Hello World!

So this Old Word Friday is going to focus on the old words I mixed into my new book Children of Sirphan, which is going to be released in 4 days (December 20th). I thought it would be appropriate to bring back some old words that I shared back at the beginning of the Old Word Friday series and they just so happen to be in use throughout my most recent book. So, without any further delay here we go!

Mullock

This word is a noun which means rubbish or nonsense. The word mullock is still popular in places like Australia and many of you would likely have heard the word mullarkey or malarkey – which is the modernized and more popular term deriving from mullock.

How do you pronounce mullock?

MUL – LUCK

How to use this word in a sentence:

“Well… you have done some unexplainable things that were explained by that mullock…” Caldor huffed.

Or…

He only hoped his colleagues wouldn’t denounce him for believing such mullock.

Should mullock make a comeback?

In a sense it already has with the term mullarkey or malarkey being so popular in other parts of the world. Mullock, though, is a word I use on a regular bases and have used in my books. I would like to see more people welcoming the word into their vocabulary but I do not know if that is going to happen anytime soon.

 

Twirlblast

Twirlblast is a noun which is another name given to a tornado or wind funnel. I chose to share this word originally because I like how it sounded and thought it funny that tornado had replaced such a silly sounding word.

How do you pronounce twirlblast?

TWIRL – BLAST

How is twirlblast used in a sentence?

“It looks like a twirlblast came through here,” Liora sighed as the old sage spun around to face her.

Or…

“Hey yoou…” Cáel strained to use the common word, while keeping a calm tone of voice. He avoided stepping on the books that lined the floor like pop pots. He didn’t need her turning her anger towards him. “Looks like a twirlblast came tearin’ through here, eh?”

Should twirlblast make a comeback?

I think it would be a fun word to know but wouldn’t be a popular word to use. I only say that because the word twirlblast sounds like your downplaying the dangers of what a tornado can do. A twirlblast sounds like a blast of hot air in the summer not a spinning funnel of destruction.

 

Nibling

An oldie but still one of my favourites. Nibling means niece or nephew. They are your siblings offspring, therefore making them your niblings. I like this word because it combines two words (niece and nephew) in to one gender neutral word (nibling). It is also very fun to say.

How do you pronounce nibling?

NIB – LING

How do you use nibling in a sentence?

“No, Li, I need yah here to help Marcia,” Foe smiled, “her family will be visitin’ and yah’ll get to meet me niblings, who I’m sure yah’ll love.”

Or…

Revris is Rebin’s nibling.

Should nibling make a comeback?

Why not? It is a fun word. It simplifies things… and there was already a movement at a school in the UK that wanted to bring nibling back. If the children are wanting to use the word I don’t see why we shouldn’t bring this word back into the normal rotation of verbal conversation.

 

So there are just the three most used OLD WORDS I used in my most recent book – Children of Sirphan! Keep your eyes open closer to December 20th to find out where you can get your copy of this wildly popular young adult fantasy. Until next time be creative, stay safe, and as always Toodles! ^.^

 

Old Word Friday: Quibble & Quibbleism

Hello World Out There World!

This week’s old word forgotten by history is quibbleism. Now, before I explain to you what this word is I’ll have to explain to you what quibble is. Quibble is the act of arguing or raising objections to something. It is a verb and you would have likely hear this word in literature during 1830-1900. Quibbleism is a noun that means ‘the practice of quibbling’. This word was used during 1836 and died off around the beginnings of the 1900s.

How are these words pronounced:

KWI – BELL

KWI-BELL-IS-MM

Examples of these words in a sentence:

The old man liked to quibble with his neighbours.

Or…

There is always a lot of quibbling going on at the courthouse.

Or…

The young lawyer’s quibbleism earned his client a retrial.

Should this word make a comeback?

Asides from it being a fun word to say I don’t think it would make a return to the common language use of today. If someone is writing a book based around 1800-1900 then it would make sense to use this word. A writer may even find the word useful if they are trying to portray a Sherlock Holmes type character. In the end, I do not see this word returning but that isn’t going to stop me from using it. 🙂

Old Word Friday: Deartuate

Hello world out there world!!

Many of you know my favourite word is bludgeon. It is such a fantastic word and comes across well as a violent word when it needs to be. I love the sound of it and the history behind it… well today’s word is something similar.

Deartuate is a verb that was created during the years 1623-1653. It was commonly used during this time. To deartuate someone is to dismember them. Again a violent word but I just find this bloody fantastic. (Pun not intended).

So how do you use deartuate in a sentence:

The murderer deartuated the body so no one could identify it with ease.

Or…

To deartuate or to not deartuate – that is the question.

This is a word that can be easier to use in a sentence than last weeks OWF. I can definitely see myself using this word in my future books, since the more the book series goes on the likelihood I will need creative terms asides from bludgeon to use in certain scenes. This is a word I want to make a comeback. Not because I like it… well that is one reason… but because it is a word that sounds as violent as what it means.

Until next week – toodles everyone!

 

 

Wonderful Word Wednesday: Whimsical

WHIMSICAL.jpg

I’ve been looking at a lot of classic children’s books recently and one word that continues popping up is whimsical. I love this word because it sounds like a word the suits its definition.

Whimsical basically fanciful or playfully charming in an amusing way. You see the word used in regards to fairytale creatures like imps, elves, or fairies. Magical princess’s may have a whimsical charm too depending on the story.

I enjoy using this word when creating children stories because it is a fun sounding word that is easy to pronounce/ sound out.

Sentences using whimsical:

Mr. Matthew’s wife was a whimsical woman.

or…

The blue fairy danced whimsically around the tree.

Wonderful Word Wednesday: Zenzizenzizenzic

Sorry for the delay in posting. I was travelling across Ontario to my new home and it took a little longer to hook up a proper internet connection to post on here. Posts should resume to a normal schedule from this post onward.

Now, for today’s WWW I give you the word zenzizenzizenzic. No I did not make up this word. No, I do not expect you to ever need to know/use this word in your lifetime. I honestly have this part of my Weird Word List which I rarely use in day-to-day writing. I just found this word fasinating in the sense it is a proper word used in mathematics.

Zenzizenzizenzic is a word for the obsolete form of mathematical notation representing the eighth power of a number (thank you Google for that definition).

I – in no way – will be using this in a sentence since it is likely to only be used to describe mathematical equations or other number sentences. You can just revival in the fact you know a word like zenzizenzizenzic and can brag to others that you now know this ridiculous word. 🙂

Old Word Friday: Snottor

For this Friday I choose the word snottor which from what I’ve read pertains to an old English word meaning ‘wise’. I like the potential imagery this word can give when used as a description. When I read snottor I think of someone older with their nose up in the air about the goings on around them. I don’t know… it’s a strange sounding word and has recently been added to words I want to use in my writing.

Ways to use snottor:

Caldor glared up from his book. As much as Liora didn’t want to ask him the man was snottor.

Or…

As she entered the large inner chamber of the library on the second floor of the Glass Tower, Liora couldn’t help but notice all the beady eyes from those hidden within. These men were snottors just like her mentor but she wasn’t sure if they would even consider answering her questions.

 

ACTUALLY I take it all back… I can’t take this word seriously enough to use it in my book. It makes me laugh whenever I read it. XD

Old Word Friday: Elflock

 

This word is a magical sounding word for something as simple as tangled hair. That is literally what an elflock is… it is a description word for tangled hair. Imagine little elves tangling your hair when you sleep… hence the origin of the word.

Sentences using elflock:

The wind wrapped elflocks blew across her face.

Or…

I woke up this morning with so many elflocks I broke my comb.

 

Old Word Friday: Bedward

 

That’s right, there is a word called bedward. Like edward + B.

Basically, bedward means to head to bed.

How to use bedward in a sentence:

After a long day at work I’m bedward.

Or…

When the children were done brushing their teeth they were ushered bedward.

Wonderful Word Wednesday: Inglenook

 

The word inglenook is a funny sounding word but I find it gives character to a place when you use it. Inglenook means a cozy/ comfortable place by the fireplace.

For example:

Liora sat in the inglenook with the leather text on her lap.

Or…

They gathered around the inglenook.

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