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Prophecy Six Blog

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funny words

Old Word Friday: Words Found in Children of Sirphan

Hello World!

So this Old Word Friday is going to focus on the old words I mixed into my new book Children of Sirphan, which is going to be released in 4 days (December 20th). I thought it would be appropriate to bring back some old words that I shared back at the beginning of the Old Word Friday series and they just so happen to be in use throughout my most recent book. So, without any further delay here we go!

Mullock

This word is a noun which means rubbish or nonsense. The word mullock is still popular in places like Australia and many of you would likely have heard the word mullarkey or malarkey – which is the modernized and more popular term deriving from mullock.

How do you pronounce mullock?

MUL – LUCK

How to use this word in a sentence:

“Well… you have done some unexplainable things that were explained by that mullock…” Caldor huffed.

Or…

He only hoped his colleagues wouldn’t denounce him for believing such mullock.

Should mullock make a comeback?

In a sense it already has with the term mullarkey or malarkey being so popular in other parts of the world. Mullock, though, is a word I use on a regular bases and have used in my books. I would like to see more people welcoming the word into their vocabulary but I do not know if that is going to happen anytime soon.

 

Twirlblast

Twirlblast is a noun which is another name given to a tornado or wind funnel. I chose to share this word originally because I like how it sounded and thought it funny that tornado had replaced such a silly sounding word.

How do you pronounce twirlblast?

TWIRL – BLAST

How is twirlblast used in a sentence?

“It looks like a twirlblast came through here,” Liora sighed as the old sage spun around to face her.

Or…

“Hey yoou…” Cáel strained to use the common word, while keeping a calm tone of voice. He avoided stepping on the books that lined the floor like pop pots. He didn’t need her turning her anger towards him. “Looks like a twirlblast came tearin’ through here, eh?”

Should twirlblast make a comeback?

I think it would be a fun word to know but wouldn’t be a popular word to use. I only say that because the word twirlblast sounds like your downplaying the dangers of what a tornado can do. A twirlblast sounds like a blast of hot air in the summer not a spinning funnel of destruction.

 

Nibling

An oldie but still one of my favourites. Nibling means niece or nephew. They are your siblings offspring, therefore making them your niblings. I like this word because it combines two words (niece and nephew) in to one gender neutral word (nibling). It is also very fun to say.

How do you pronounce nibling?

NIB – LING

How do you use nibling in a sentence?

“No, Li, I need yah here to help Marcia,” Foe smiled, “her family will be visitin’ and yah’ll get to meet me niblings, who I’m sure yah’ll love.”

Or…

Revris is Rebin’s nibling.

Should nibling make a comeback?

Why not? It is a fun word. It simplifies things… and there was already a movement at a school in the UK that wanted to bring nibling back. If the children are wanting to use the word I don’t see why we shouldn’t bring this word back into the normal rotation of verbal conversation.

 

So there are just the three most used OLD WORDS I used in my most recent book – Children of Sirphan! Keep your eyes open closer to December 20th to find out where you can get your copy of this wildly popular young adult fantasy. Until next time be creative, stay safe, and as always Toodles! ^.^

 

Old Word Friday: Privign

Hello World Out There World!

This weeks old word is privign. Now, this word is a noun that was used mostly between 1605 all the way to 1654. Privign is a fancier way of saying stepson… why they had to make a fancier term for stepson I don’t know but that’s what this weeks word means.

How to pronounce this weeks word:

PRI-VINE

Examples of using privign in a sentence:

He was looking forward to gaining a privign after he married the love of his life.

Or…

The woman was known to not be so kind to her privign.

Or…

Their privign was treated more like a housekeeper than one of their children.

Should this would be brought back?

I think if you are writing historical fiction or getting together with your steampunk buddies for an adventure around town this word would make more sense to use… but to use it in common, everyday conversation – no. Like many of the words I do in this segment privign is a fun word to say but it’s one that would take more explaining than it would to just say stepson. This doesn’t mean I won’t use it but I doubt it is going to make a comeback. 🙂

OLD WORD FRIDAY: Ossifragant

Hello World Out There World!

This weeks OWF is ossifragant, which is a adjective founded around 1656.

The word ossifragant means, ‘bone-breaking’.

How you pronounce the word is:

O – SIF -RAG -ANT

Examples of using ossifragant in a sentence:

She heard the ossifragant noise of her hand when the shelf felt on top of her.

Or…

He was known for his ossifragant blow.

Should this word come back?

Nope. I think this word should stay dead as the word ossifragant doesn’t have the same gut wrenching feeling as bone-breaking. Unless you have a character that uses big words that no one is meant to comprehend, then don’t use this word. It is hard to set in a sentence without it sounding strange and it isn’t a word that is easy to read. If you are saying ossifragant in regular, everyday conversation no one is going to get what you’re saying and you’ll probably end up having to explain it – losing the whole feeling for what you are trying to say. I’m not going to lie, I find this word sounds pretty but bone-breaking isn’t supposed to sound pretty or poetic… so the word in my opinion doesn’t work with what it means. At the end of the day this word died for a reason and should stay buried.

Old Word Friday: Kexy

Hello World Out There World!

Now, this weeks word I could see making a comeback. It could even become as popular as the word bae. Bae by the way did not originally mean what it means today. Bae originated as a Danish word for poop… it does not mean baby or babe. So, the next time you text your loved one “ur my bae!” remember you just called them your poop.

Anyways, now that I ruined that for all of you…

This weeks old word is an adjective and originated around 1608 lasting until 1884. The word kexy means something dry, brittle, or withered.

Pronouncing the word:

KEX – EE

Some examples of this word in a sentence word be:

My brother’s cooking always turns out kexy.

Or…

These potato chips are really kexy.

Or… (Just because this is now stuck in my head)

I’m kexy and I know it. XD

Do you think this is going to make a comeback?

Probably… but not in a way it was originally intended. I think the word kexy will come back as a portmanteau (two words fused into one) for the words kinky and sexy. I would want it to make a comeback for it’s original definition, and I’ll probably end up as that weird person at a party using the word while all the other kids look at me like I’ve come from another planet. I honestly do not know if they word will make a comeback at all, it is a fun word to say and I can see it confusing a lot of people when it is used but like all the other words I talk about it will probably not make a comeback. 🙂

What do you think? How would you use the word KEXY?

 

Old Word Friday: Jobler

Hello World Out There World!

This weeks old word Friday is jobler. Jobler is a noun believed to have been created around 1662 and didn’t grow in popularity after that. This weeks word means ‘someone who works small jobs’.

Pronunciation of this word is:

job-ler

Examples of using this word in a sentence are:

If you can’t find full-time work than become a jobler.

Or…

I met a nice gentleman the other day who’s a wonderful jobler.

I like the word jobler. It is easy and fun to say, which is usually the reasons behind why I want certain words to come back into common use – like nibling. If used in common conversation jobler may confuse some people but the word has job in it… so it is possible that those you say the word to will pick up on what it could mean. I would love to have this word make a comeback, but only time will tell. :3

Wonderful Word Wednesday: Zenzizenzizenzic

Sorry for the delay in posting. I was travelling across Ontario to my new home and it took a little longer to hook up a proper internet connection to post on here. Posts should resume to a normal schedule from this post onward.

Now, for today’s WWW I give you the word zenzizenzizenzic. No I did not make up this word. No, I do not expect you to ever need to know/use this word in your lifetime. I honestly have this part of my Weird Word List which I rarely use in day-to-day writing. I just found this word fasinating in the sense it is a proper word used in mathematics.

Zenzizenzizenzic is a word for the obsolete form of mathematical notation representing the eighth power of a number (thank you Google for that definition).

I – in no way – will be using this in a sentence since it is likely to only be used to describe mathematical equations or other number sentences. You can just revival in the fact you know a word like zenzizenzizenzic and can brag to others that you now know this ridiculous word. 🙂

Old Word Friday: Snottor

For this Friday I choose the word snottor which from what I’ve read pertains to an old English word meaning ‘wise’. I like the potential imagery this word can give when used as a description. When I read snottor I think of someone older with their nose up in the air about the goings on around them. I don’t know… it’s a strange sounding word and has recently been added to words I want to use in my writing.

Ways to use snottor:

Caldor glared up from his book. As much as Liora didn’t want to ask him the man was snottor.

Or…

As she entered the large inner chamber of the library on the second floor of the Glass Tower, Liora couldn’t help but notice all the beady eyes from those hidden within. These men were snottors just like her mentor but she wasn’t sure if they would even consider answering her questions.

 

ACTUALLY I take it all back… I can’t take this word seriously enough to use it in my book. It makes me laugh whenever I read it. XD

Wonderful Word Wednesday: Collywobbles

Today I have collywobbles. I must have eaten something or not eaten enough of something today to cause this stomach problem. All day my stomach has been doing flip flops – it sucks. 😦

Anyways, that’s not stopping me from posting WWW and if you haven’t guessed it – the word is collywobbles. But what does it mean?

Pretty much what I put in the first part – a collywobble is when you feel pain in the abdomen and especially in the stomach; a bellyache. People believe that this word came from the Latin word pertaining to cholera (cholera morbus). Although it may have been used as a serious medical term back in the day, it now has changed to signify much lesser/ sever gastrol issue(s). Not to mention it is a super fun word to say over and over again. 🙂

Ways to use collywobble in a sentence:

The class came down with collywobbles after eating Ms. Burtworth’s cookies.

Or…

I called in sick to work because of collywobbles.

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