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Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

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What is your writing Kryptonite?

Hello Internet Friends,

This week we are talking about writing Kryptonite and for those that don’t know what that is… basically what is your writing weakness. I was trying to be all smart with wanting to do a comparison between my green kryptonite and my red kryptonite but for the sake of my readers who aren’t Superman fans… I will just focus on my weakness (green kryptonite).

With that said, my writing weakness is the internet.

The internet can be useful with research but man it ruins any motivation I have to write. I may start off wanting to research about medical practices of the medieval age (or lack there of) and eight hours later be watching YouTube videos of cats saying ‘no’. The internet is not only the place I do research but also where I sell my books and connect with my readership. So, as much as I want to disconnect I am tied to it.

The worst part – I know I should be doing something else but I get distracted by so many people online or information online that I never get back to my intended purpose for opening up my browser in the first place. I know I’m not alone with this problem. Many of you have told me that the internet hinders your writing drive.

What is your writing krytonite? Is it the internet or something else? Let me know in the comment section down below, and until next time remember to stay safe, be creative, and as always toodles!! ^.^

Thinking Thursdays: Plotter or Pantser?

Hi everybody!

This week on Thinking Thursdays we are tackling the question: Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Simple answer is:

Yes.

Long answer:

I’m a both.

Majority of the time when it comes to writing I will be a pantser. I find my mind flows better when I’m not restricted by a set of restraints plotting puts on my style. I like the surprises I have when I write without plans because the story may end in a completely different way than what I believed it would be when I was working at the beginning.

With that said, since I am writing a series I have been doing some plotting. Not a lot of plotting but enough to hinder my voice… just enough that the story stays on track.

Once I have completed a book and it’s released I read through, taking notes of the important pieces that I foreshadowed to make sure I don’t miss revealing them in a later book. I also do a brief breakdown of what each character in the next book is going to do, what their plan/ goals are, and how they are going to reach them. It is then I start typing.

Something you all have to understand is I never look at a book as just one book. When I’m writing I look at a book like it is one episode in a season… or maybe better a season in a series. When I’m writing Children of Sirphan my brain is already thinking of what is happening in book 5 or 6. When I’m figuring out a chapter in book 3, my brain is thinking of ways to solve an issue in book 4. I write my stories with a large array of knowledge stuffed in my tiny brain that directs me to writing what ends up in the books I have and will be publishing.

People would say, “Well, Deanna, isn’t that plotting?”

To them I say, not really because when I come across an issue that I didn’t think about while writing my current book that one change could change the entire story my brain had pre-made for me to write. That means my brain sets fire to everything it has come up with, destroying my mind castle to its foundation before picking up the stones to start building everything again. I don’t have a set plan written down, or chapters jotted out. My notes are filled with character interactions but in all sense of the word I have no idea what they are going to do.

I have an end goal in mind – meaning I know how the series will end and various footpaths on how they could get there but I don’t have any set plans on which paths they are going to take.

The best way I can describe my writing approach is that I’m a DM (Dungeon Master) and my characters are my players. I have given them a world, their equipment, their skills but it is their personalities/ actions that drive the game. I could have planned them to take the left path but instead they chose the right leading to a completely different event but working towards the set end.

Does that make sense or have I lost all of you with that analogy?

Anyways the point I’m trying to make is that I’m not a traditional plotter type writer but at the same time I’m not a pantser either. I have ideas and plans on where I want my characters to go but sometimes they change the direction of the game. It keeps me interested in my writing and in turn continues to prove to me how much I love to write. I never know what my characters have planned and that’s fine with me.

Now for today’s questions:
Are you a plotter, pantser, or a little of both? Did you understand my D&D analogy? What is your favourite drink to have on a cold winter day? (Mine’s chai tea).
Until next time remember to stay safe, get creative, and as always toodles! ^.^

Thinking Thursdays: Avoiding Alliteration

Hello World Out There World!

If you have followed me for a while you will know that I love using alliteration. For those of you not in the know, alliteration is:

alliteration
Thanks Google! 🙂

Examples of alliteration would be this segment (Thinking Thursdays) or even the title for the post (Avoiding Alliteration). There are many people (writers mostly) who say that real writers don’t use alliteration. That is it lazy, not creative, and annoying. I don’t know why that is… I mean if Marvel uses alliteration it must been good, right?

When it comes to how I use alliteration I usually use it to emphasize something in a sentence, or draw a readers attention to certain details. Alliteration helps a reader recall a certain moment in the book later on, or connects a certain thing with a character. I also use alliteration to help with the flow of a sentence or cut down on unwanted word usage to get my point across.

Alliteration is a useful tool for a writer, just like the word said. Both forms are told to be ignored or removed but in small amounts they can help a story flow.

I love how people keep insisting that there are rules to writing… but in the end they are only guidelines to help you get started. In the end you will write the way you want with witty alliteration anyways.

But this is Thinking Thursday, so, I want to know what you think. Should writers avoid alliteration? Why or why not? Leave your answers in the comments below and until next time – toodles! o^.^o

Thinking Thursdays: Research & Writing

Hello World Out There World!
This week I’m tackling the question: How important is research to you when writing a book?
I went into some little detail regarding this question on my author interview with Serious Reading a while back but I thought I’d dive in deeper. So, here we go!

Depending on the topic I could spend 10 minutes to 10 weeks researching. When it comes to my blog posts, most of what I write is opinion based and therefore doesn’t have a lot of facts required. Not saying what I’m writing on my blogs I didn’t research… it is just what I’ve written on here is my formulated opinion on the things I’ve read online or formed after having conversations with others interested in these topics.

What I usually spend time researching is what I’ll be using in my books. I want to be able to share correct information with my readers… as I believe if I am going to have people read my work it should be close to accurate as possible. People learn from reading and I don’t want to be sharing the wrong information. At the same time, I am no close to being an expert as Trump is at being a good President. I do not claim to know all the science behind natural health practices. I do not claim to be an expert in medieval history or military tactics. I’ve read books, I’ve made notes and those notes I use in my work. At the same time, I have to trust that the information that I’ve read is correct. For all I know the six books I’ve read could be a creation of someones opinion and not based in fact at all.

That’s one reason why I love writing fictions because as much as I may have truth weaved between the words my writing doesn’t have to be taken as truth. I could include actual ointment recipes or how to make your own tea within the pages of my book but at the same time not be taken completely seriously because of the fact my characters ride magical creatures and shoot lightening bolts from their fingertips, (all right maybe not lightening bolts… but you get the point).

Research is important. Most writers understand and know this. Most writers want to come across as competent in their craft and at times fear about being corrected or called a hack for not getting something right in their books. I know I have the fear and that is why I spend the time exploring the subjects I include in my books I’m not familiar with like naturopathy, botany, and medieval combat. As much as my world is based in fantasy it is my research that helps ground my readers in some kind of twisted, relatable reality.

Am I the only one to think this or are there some writers out there that feel the same way? Am I doing too much research or is this common for writers to feel this way? I’d like to know your opinion on this matter, so don’t be afraid to leave a comment in the area below.
Remember stay safe, be creative and until next time – Toodles! o^.^o

 

 

 

 

Thinking Thursdays: Depression, Suicide and Writers (TW)

Hello World Out There World!

I am going to start off with stating that there is a Trigger Warning for this post. We will be discussing depression, suicide, and mental health in this post which may bother some of you or affect some of you. With that said, you have been warned.

The discussion below is a combination of two questions I was asked to answer during an author’s interview a few weeks back for Serious Reading and I thought that sharing some of what we discussed would be both something different and give you my view on these issues. If you want to read more of my interest with Serious Reading CLICK HERE.

All right, now that that is out of the way – let’s begin:

Writers are permanently depressed; how true is that?

I can see how some people would believe that. There are writers that have written about their depression or have become victims of suicide. Many of the greats we study today were depressed, or suffered from some mental health issues. But, just as there are writers that suffer from permanent depression there are those that have never and will never suffer from a mental health disorder.

To answer your question, I don’t think it is true because it depends on the writer and every writer is different.

Personally, I’ve struggled with depression and anxiety. The important part was that I recognized the problem and got help. I spoke with people that helped me find ways to cope with my mental health but there are those out there that never seek help or never require the help they need.

Being aware of your mental health and looking for ways of educating yourself or getting help with managing your mental health is important. It saddens me that in a time where we have so much knowledge we have yet to really approach the subjects of mental health.

Sure, there are brief mentions of it when we lose someone famous we admire to suicide. Their loss sparks a short discussion but there is so much we as a society need to do to change the way we think about mental health.

 

Poets and writers in general, have a reputation of committing suicide; in your opinion, why is that the case?

I think poets and writers are empathetic people that are tuned into the world. That could be both a good thing and a bad thing. The good out of being one with the world is that you see the beauty and the potential it holds. You catch the connections between people or the environment and find ways of creating that emotional connection through words. Many writers (Shakespeare, Poe, Wolfe, Bronte) all have a way of putting humanity in their works and painting this world that is so close to our own while still giving us a sense of disconnect. This is a talent some have naturally, while for others – like myself – work at building.

The bad part about being connected to the world is that you see the horrific truths many aren’t aware of. You catch sight of the darkness in people and some writers even confront the darkness within themselves. Everyone has demons that whisper in the back of their minds nasty realizations, but writers tap into those whispers and sometimes don’t have the strength to stop listening. It is at that point that writers can’t see that beauty but instead see the world in a tainted light where only pain and suffering thrive.

I think every writer/person is able to deal with the negatives in different ways. Some are able to find ways back to the rose tinted glasses world that the majority of society lives in, while others aren’t so lucky. It’s those unlucky ones that don’t see hope and don’t have the strength to pull themselves out… who think they’re alone… that add to the reputations that writers/ poets generally commit suicide.

I want to know what you think.

Do you agree with my answers to these questions? Do you disagree? If you disagree, tell me why. I would love to get a discussion started in the comments down below. 🙂

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