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Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

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old English

Old Word Friday: NOSCIBLE

Today’s Old Word Friday is noscible.

Noscible is an adjective that was used mostly around 1654. The word isn’t as noscible as it was back then and so that’s why it finds itself on this list of forgettable old words.

If you haven’t guess the meaning of the word from the last sentence noscible pretty much means ‘knowable or something well-known’. Now that previous sentence probably makes a lot more sense.

How to pronounce the word:

NO – SIB – LE

Should this word come back?

I think so. It is a good word and I love how it sounds in sentences. Noscible, when used correctly, sounds like the word you are wanting to use. It also has a similar sound to noticeable… which is possibly why this word would work in modern conversation. I know I’ll be trying to use it in my regular conversations from now on… but I think by now people expect me to have a old style vocabulary. XD

Old Word Friday: MISQUEME

Hello World Out There World!

This week on OWF we are tackling a verb that was created around 1395 and lasted until 1658. This word lasted longer than the others I’ve shared with you all on my other posts and that might be because of what this word means.

Misqueme means to displease or to offend someone. This is a great word to use as there is an election coming up and this word will be a great replacement for the other rhetoric that has blown up on all the social media sites.

This weeks word is pronounced:

MIS – QUE – ME

Some examples of using this word in sentences are:

When Trump opens his mouth it is only a matter of time before he misquemes someone.

Or…

Hillary’s email scandal misquemed a lot of her supporters.

Or…

A lot of us are misqueme they don’t have another candidate to vote for.

Conclusion:

Do I want this word to come back? Sure, I can see it being a useful word. I also think it would add a new word to the rhetoric that we are hearing around the US election. I also like how it sounds when you say it, it is a very catchy word.

Old Word Friday: Fallaciloquence & Gardeviance

Hello world out there world!

Welcome back to Old World Friday! This week I have two words to share with you… and both happen to be quite the mouthful.

So, let’s get started.

This first word we are going to work with is fallaciloquence.

Pronounced: fall-a-cil-o-quence

You probably can figure out why that word has disappeared as it isn’t the easiest one to pronounce or the easiest one to fit into sentences but HEY! We can try, right?

Fallaciloquence is a noun that was believed to have been created around 1656 and was used commonly up to around 1761. The word means deceitful or false speech – which is short to write or say that than to put fallaciloquence… but that’s besirdes the point.

It is one of those fancy words that may help you sound smarter… or possibly make a character you wish to be smart sound snobbish or disconnected to common word uses.

Two sentences I came up with to use this word are:

Despite his popularity the presidential candidate was known for his fallaciloquence.

Or…

No one should trust a person with fallociloquence.

The second word I will be sharing with you today isn’t are hard to use in a sentence as fallaciloquence. This word is also a noun thought of have been created around 1459 and lessened in popularity around 1706. The word is gardeviance.

Pronounced: gar – deviance

What is a gardeviance? It is a fancier name for a chest you keep valuables in or clothing in. It is also another word for travelling trunk.

Some suggestions on where to use this word in your writing would be in a fantasy story with a foot in medieval history. Or a historical fiction of some sort based in the time when that word was more commonly used. If you have a time travelling character or an immortal character they could use that word as well.

Two examples of using this word in a sentence are:

Mother kept all my baby clothes in the oak gardeviance in our living room.

Or…

I love going to antique stores and seeing the large assortment of gardeviances.

Out of these two words I would find myself using gardeviance more than fallaciloquence as most of what I write is YA fantasy with medieval details. That doesn’t mean I won’t use both words eventually, I just find that gardeviance is an easier word to use than the mouthful that was the first word we covered.

Do I hope for these words to make a comeback?

No, unlike other words I’ve approached in the past these words would not suit modern day conversation unless you wish to set a bad precedence with being known as a snob. The words would work in conversation with other word lovers but not with strangers at a bus stop.

And until next time – toodles!!

Old Word Friday: ECSTASIATE

Hello world out there world!

I’m going to try something new today. I am going to show you the video I made for this weeks OWF. I’m hoping to turn this into a regular thing, but we shall see. So, check it out and please leave comments below letting me know what you’d like me to do videos on. 🙂

 

 

 

Old Word Friday: Deartuate

Hello world out there world!!

Many of you know my favourite word is bludgeon. It is such a fantastic word and comes across well as a violent word when it needs to be. I love the sound of it and the history behind it… well today’s word is something similar.

Deartuate is a verb that was created during the years 1623-1653. It was commonly used during this time. To deartuate someone is to dismember them. Again a violent word but I just find this bloody fantastic. (Pun not intended).

So how do you use deartuate in a sentence:

The murderer deartuated the body so no one could identify it with ease.

Or…

To deartuate or to not deartuate – that is the question.

This is a word that can be easier to use in a sentence than last weeks OWF. I can definitely see myself using this word in my future books, since the more the book series goes on the likelihood I will need creative terms asides from bludgeon to use in certain scenes. This is a word I want to make a comeback. Not because I like it… well that is one reason… but because it is a word that sounds as violent as what it means.

Until next week – toodles everyone!

 

 

Old Word Friday: Cacozealous

This weeks OWF is cacozealous. This adjective was created and mostly used between 1656-1696. The word means to imitate badly or something that is poorly affected.

Examples of this word in a sentence are:

The student’s cacozealous attempt of impersonating their teacher was in terrible taste.

Or…

They were cacozealous by the bad weather.

….

I understand how this word could have faded away over the years. It is awkward to use in sentences and has a hard time working in conjunction with other words. I would suggest using this word in a minimal way, or to spice up a sentence instead of using imitated badly or poorly affected. This is one word though, I would like not want to see make a come back.

 

Old Word Friday:BAJULATE

This week’s old word is BAJULATE.

Bajulate is a verb believed to have been created during 1613-1662. The exact creator of this word is unknown and origin of original work is unknown. What is known is that this word is Latin based and it means ‘to bear a heavy burden’.

Examples of how to use this in a sentence:

Everyone knew the old sage was bajulate when it came to protecting his young apprentice.

 

My suggestion would be to try and avoid using this word unless you wish to confuse people. Yes, it is interesting but there a various tenses to use depending on the formation of the sentence and as this is a Latin based word, you get into complicated plurals that aren’t as easily translated into what our common based Latin derived English has developed into. If you still wish for whatever nightmarish reason to use this word in your works I would suggest checking out the links connected to THIS page and learning all you can about it.

Until next time – toodles!

Old Word Friday: Acrasial

 

That’s right!

After a long break OWF (Old Word Friday) has returned. I needed to build back up my old work list and do some research so I could share them with the world. I’m so happy to be getting back to the roots of this blog since OWF is one of the original posts I did on a weekly bases since this place started.

So, without further ado I give you this week’s old word: ACRASIAL

Acrasial is an adjective believed to have been created in 1851. It was believed to be first used by the American novelist Sylvester Judd who lived from 1813-1853 in Westhampton, Massachusetts.

The word means ill-regulated or ill-tempered.

For example:

Robert Baratheon was an acrasial king.

Or…

The acrasial teacher was known to throw desks at his students.

The use of acrasial can be found in a lot of older books but is a term rarely used in modern works. I love this word because I love interesting adjectives that are forgotten by time.

Question of the day:

Have you heard or read the word acrasial before? If so where?

 

Old Word Friday: Cockalorum

 

Cockalorum sounds like a spell from a Harry Potter book, but it is actually a word that means ‘a small man with narcissism or a self-important man’. This word was used quite often in England during the 18th century. This word fell out of popularity quickly, although you can still hear people using the term when talking about politicians or celebrities in the bars – according to a few friends of mine. XD

So, how would you using cockalorum in a sentence?

That man is a cockalorum if ever I met one.

Or…

If he keeps talking like that they may think him a cockalorum.

 

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