Search

Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

Tag

OLD WORD FRIDAY

Old Word Friday: NOSCIBLE

Today’s Old Word Friday is noscible.

Noscible is an adjective that was used mostly around 1654. The word isn’t as noscible as it was back then and so that’s why it finds itself on this list of forgettable old words.

If you haven’t guess the meaning of the word from the last sentence noscible pretty much means ‘knowable or something well-known’. Now that previous sentence probably makes a lot more sense.

How to pronounce the word:

NO – SIB – LE

Should this word come back?

I think so. It is a good word and I love how it sounds in sentences. Noscible, when used correctly, sounds like the word you are wanting to use. It also has a similar sound to noticeable… which is possibly why this word would work in modern conversation. I know I’ll be trying to use it in my regular conversations from now on… but I think by now people expect me to have a old style vocabulary. XD

Old Word Friday: MISQUEME

Hello World Out There World!

This week on OWF we are tackling a verb that was created around 1395 and lasted until 1658. This word lasted longer than the others I’ve shared with you all on my other posts and that might be because of what this word means.

Misqueme means to displease or to offend someone. This is a great word to use as there is an election coming up and this word will be a great replacement for the other rhetoric that has blown up on all the social media sites.

This weeks word is pronounced:

MIS – QUE – ME

Some examples of using this word in sentences are:

When Trump opens his mouth it is only a matter of time before he misquemes someone.

Or…

Hillary’s email scandal misquemed a lot of her supporters.

Or…

A lot of us are misqueme they don’t have another candidate to vote for.

Conclusion:

Do I want this word to come back? Sure, I can see it being a useful word. I also think it would add a new word to the rhetoric that we are hearing around the US election. I also like how it sounds when you say it, it is a very catchy word.

Old Word Friday: Labascate

Hello World Out There World!

Old Word Friday is brought to you by LABASCATE. Don’t just fall like any regular pleb – labascate instead. 🙂

Pronouncing this weeks word:

LAB – A – SKATE

 

All right, so this weeks word is a verb and was believed to be used mostly around 1727. It didn’t gain in any popularity and quickly became unpopular around the same time.

Here are some ways to use this word in a sentence:

The dog labascated down the stairs.

Or…

In the winter we love to labascate down the hill in the backyard.

Or…

I’m afraid the car will labascate in these road conditions.

The word labascate means to “start falling or sliding”. I honestly think it would be easier to say fall or slide instead of an elaborate word like labascate but some people like to use fancy words like that. This word would work best with a intellectual character like Sherlock Holmes or for a time period set between the end of the Renaissance to the middle of the Victorian era. Really it is up to you if you want to use this word or not, but it does sound sophisticated.

 

Old Word Friday: Kexy

Hello World Out There World!

Now, this weeks word I could see making a comeback. It could even become as popular as the word bae. Bae by the way did not originally mean what it means today. Bae originated as a Danish word for poop… it does not mean baby or babe. So, the next time you text your loved one “ur my bae!” remember you just called them your poop.

Anyways, now that I ruined that for all of you…

This weeks old word is an adjective and originated around 1608 lasting until 1884. The word kexy means something dry, brittle, or withered.

Pronouncing the word:

KEX – EE

Some examples of this word in a sentence word be:

My brother’s cooking always turns out kexy.

Or…

These potato chips are really kexy.

Or… (Just because this is now stuck in my head)

I’m kexy and I know it. XD

Do you think this is going to make a comeback?

Probably… but not in a way it was originally intended. I think the word kexy will come back as a portmanteau (two words fused into one) for the words kinky and sexy. I would want it to make a comeback for it’s original definition, and I’ll probably end up as that weird person at a party using the word while all the other kids look at me like I’ve come from another planet. I honestly do not know if they word will make a comeback at all, it is a fun word to say and I can see it confusing a lot of people when it is used but like all the other words I talk about it will probably not make a comeback. 🙂

What do you think? How would you use the word KEXY?

 

Old Word Friday: Jobler

Hello World Out There World!

This weeks old word Friday is jobler. Jobler is a noun believed to have been created around 1662 and didn’t grow in popularity after that. This weeks word means ‘someone who works small jobs’.

Pronunciation of this word is:

job-ler

Examples of using this word in a sentence are:

If you can’t find full-time work than become a jobler.

Or…

I met a nice gentleman the other day who’s a wonderful jobler.

I like the word jobler. It is easy and fun to say, which is usually the reasons behind why I want certain words to come back into common use – like nibling. If used in common conversation jobler may confuse some people but the word has job in it… so it is possible that those you say the word to will pick up on what it could mean. I would love to have this word make a comeback, but only time will tell. :3

Old Word Friday: ICASM

Hello World Out There World!

Since the last couple of OWF’s have been a mouthful to say I thought this week I would bring to your attention a short, simple word that happens to be one of my favourites. Today’s OWF happens to be a short word that was created around 1664. The word icasm is a noun, (a person, place, or thing). The definition of this word is: a figurative expression in speech.

How do you pronounce this word?

I – CAS – M

Some examples of using icasm in a sentence are:

The girl protested that the threats she made to the boy were only an icasm.

Or…

My teacher has a bad habit for using icasms.

Should icasm make a come-back to our common speech?

I know I’ll be using it when I speak. It sounds like a funny little word and with my habit of using icasms when I take it may come in handy. I don’t think it will return to everyday language but maybe to certain word enthusiasts.

 

Old Word Friday: Halatinous

Hello World Out There World!

For this Friday I’m going to share with you a word I’ve used in my second book. The word is an adjective and was created around 1886. It’s popularity didn’t last long as apparently it wasn’t used much after 1886.

The way you would pronounce this word is as follows: hay – latin – us

Halatinous means something salty. I believe that halatinous is one of those words one would use if they are making a character with a larger than normal vocabulary similar to Sherlock Holmes. In my case this would be the old sage Caldor, since he is known to have a larger vocabulary than most and loves sounding smart.

So, how would you use halatinous in a sentence? Here are some examples:

The halatinous water burned her eyes.

Or…

The rain tasted halatinous on his tongue.

Would I want this word to come back?

I’m sure in certain fields this word is still used, (science or geology), but I don’t think this word would do well in modern day common conversation. You would spend more time explaining what halatinous is to someone and since we like to make things easy for everyone we may decide saying salty is the better option. I could see this word being used in literature, like I mentioned above, someone with a high IQ or with a well developed vocabulary would likely be found using this word.

Asides from it being a fun word to say I do not believe it will make a comeback any time soon.

Old Word Friday: Fallaciloquence & Gardeviance

Hello world out there world!

Welcome back to Old World Friday! This week I have two words to share with you… and both happen to be quite the mouthful.

So, let’s get started.

This first word we are going to work with is fallaciloquence.

Pronounced: fall-a-cil-o-quence

You probably can figure out why that word has disappeared as it isn’t the easiest one to pronounce or the easiest one to fit into sentences but HEY! We can try, right?

Fallaciloquence is a noun that was believed to have been created around 1656 and was used commonly up to around 1761. The word means deceitful or false speech – which is short to write or say that than to put fallaciloquence… but that’s besirdes the point.

It is one of those fancy words that may help you sound smarter… or possibly make a character you wish to be smart sound snobbish or disconnected to common word uses.

Two sentences I came up with to use this word are:

Despite his popularity the presidential candidate was known for his fallaciloquence.

Or…

No one should trust a person with fallociloquence.

The second word I will be sharing with you today isn’t are hard to use in a sentence as fallaciloquence. This word is also a noun thought of have been created around 1459 and lessened in popularity around 1706. The word is gardeviance.

Pronounced: gar – deviance

What is a gardeviance? It is a fancier name for a chest you keep valuables in or clothing in. It is also another word for travelling trunk.

Some suggestions on where to use this word in your writing would be in a fantasy story with a foot in medieval history. Or a historical fiction of some sort based in the time when that word was more commonly used. If you have a time travelling character or an immortal character they could use that word as well.

Two examples of using this word in a sentence are:

Mother kept all my baby clothes in the oak gardeviance in our living room.

Or…

I love going to antique stores and seeing the large assortment of gardeviances.

Out of these two words I would find myself using gardeviance more than fallaciloquence as most of what I write is YA fantasy with medieval details. That doesn’t mean I won’t use both words eventually, I just find that gardeviance is an easier word to use than the mouthful that was the first word we covered.

Do I hope for these words to make a comeback?

No, unlike other words I’ve approached in the past these words would not suit modern day conversation unless you wish to set a bad precedence with being known as a snob. The words would work in conversation with other word lovers but not with strangers at a bus stop.

And until next time – toodles!!

Old Word Friday: ECSTASIATE

Hello world out there world!

I’m going to try something new today. I am going to show you the video I made for this weeks OWF. I’m hoping to turn this into a regular thing, but we shall see. So, check it out and please leave comments below letting me know what you’d like me to do videos on. 🙂

 

 

 

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑