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Old Word Friday: Welmish & Yelve

Hello World!

Last week I didn’t do an Old Word Friday, so since it was Christmas and New Years I thought I’d be nice and gift you two Old Words this week. This weeks words are welmish and yelve.

First off, let’s start with welmish.

Asides from it sounding like one of my character names, this words is an adjective mostly popular during the year 1688. This words is a fun one to say but you aren’t here for that. You want to know what the word means. Well, welmish is a word that describes a ‘pale or sickly colour’.

This word is pronounced:

WEL – MISH

Some examples of this word in a sentence are:

It was clear she wasn’t well with her welmish complexion.

Or…

After riding the roller-coaster the children had a welmish appearance.

Or…

When the plane hit turbulence many of its passengers turned welmish.

 

The second word this week is yelve.

This is a noun popular during the years 1000-1886. This is basically another name for a dung-fork, or garden-fork.

The way you pronounce yelve is:

YELL-V

An example or two of this word in a sentence is:

The farmer swung the yelve over his shoulder.

Or…

The young boy used the yelve to clean the horse’s stall.

Or…

My grandmother is set on using her old, rusted yelve instead of getting a new one.

Should these words make a comeback to modern day conversation?

Maybe. I have used the term yelve be used around farmers markets and history museums. It isn’t a term that is forgotten so much as it takes a particular group of people with a certain set of interests to use this word in regular conversation. As for welmish, I know I’m be using this word. Not only is is a fun word to say but it is always a great word to put into a sentence. Welmish gives off the feeling of not being so well… similar to how the word meh is used in common conversation.

Anyways, what do you think? Have you heard of these words before or do you see yourself using this words in your regular conversations? Let me know in the comment section down below.

Until next time stay safe, be creative, and as always toodles! ^.^

Also… enjoy the video I’ve made for this post if you want!

 

Old Word Friday: Words Found in Children of Sirphan

Hello World!

So this Old Word Friday is going to focus on the old words I mixed into my new book Children of Sirphan, which is going to be released in 4 days (December 20th). I thought it would be appropriate to bring back some old words that I shared back at the beginning of the Old Word Friday series and they just so happen to be in use throughout my most recent book. So, without any further delay here we go!

Mullock

This word is a noun which means rubbish or nonsense. The word mullock is still popular in places like Australia and many of you would likely have heard the word mullarkey or malarkey – which is the modernized and more popular term deriving from mullock.

How do you pronounce mullock?

MUL – LUCK

How to use this word in a sentence:

“Well… you have done some unexplainable things that were explained by that mullock…” Caldor huffed.

Or…

He only hoped his colleagues wouldn’t denounce him for believing such mullock.

Should mullock make a comeback?

In a sense it already has with the term mullarkey or malarkey being so popular in other parts of the world. Mullock, though, is a word I use on a regular bases and have used in my books. I would like to see more people welcoming the word into their vocabulary but I do not know if that is going to happen anytime soon.

 

Twirlblast

Twirlblast is a noun which is another name given to a tornado or wind funnel. I chose to share this word originally because I like how it sounded and thought it funny that tornado had replaced such a silly sounding word.

How do you pronounce twirlblast?

TWIRL – BLAST

How is twirlblast used in a sentence?

“It looks like a twirlblast came through here,” Liora sighed as the old sage spun around to face her.

Or…

“Hey yoou…” Cáel strained to use the common word, while keeping a calm tone of voice. He avoided stepping on the books that lined the floor like pop pots. He didn’t need her turning her anger towards him. “Looks like a twirlblast came tearin’ through here, eh?”

Should twirlblast make a comeback?

I think it would be a fun word to know but wouldn’t be a popular word to use. I only say that because the word twirlblast sounds like your downplaying the dangers of what a tornado can do. A twirlblast sounds like a blast of hot air in the summer not a spinning funnel of destruction.

 

Nibling

An oldie but still one of my favourites. Nibling means niece or nephew. They are your siblings offspring, therefore making them your niblings. I like this word because it combines two words (niece and nephew) in to one gender neutral word (nibling). It is also very fun to say.

How do you pronounce nibling?

NIB – LING

How do you use nibling in a sentence?

“No, Li, I need yah here to help Marcia,” Foe smiled, “her family will be visitin’ and yah’ll get to meet me niblings, who I’m sure yah’ll love.”

Or…

Revris is Rebin’s nibling.

Should nibling make a comeback?

Why not? It is a fun word. It simplifies things… and there was already a movement at a school in the UK that wanted to bring nibling back. If the children are wanting to use the word I don’t see why we shouldn’t bring this word back into the normal rotation of verbal conversation.

 

So there are just the three most used OLD WORDS I used in my most recent book – Children of Sirphan! Keep your eyes open closer to December 20th to find out where you can get your copy of this wildly popular young adult fantasy. Until next time be creative, stay safe, and as always Toodles! ^.^

 

Old Word Friday: Thural

Hello World Out There World!

As the winter holiday’s are drawing closer we are starting to fill our houses with all kinds of wonderful smells. Right now, with all the baking I’ve been doing my house smells of apple and baked goods. This led me to looking for a word to add to my collection which I could use instead of candle but it turns out I found a word pertaining to incense instead. This week’s OWF is brought to you by thural, an adjective (descriptive word) that was created around 1624. The word thural means ‘of or pertaining to incense’.

So, how is this word pronounced?

THUR- AL

Examples of this word in a sentence:

Every Christmas our house is filled with thural herbs like cinnamon, sage, and thyme.

Or…

The thural smells of clove filled the kitchen.

Or…

I love whenever I burn thural herbs as it makes my house smell amazing.

Should this word make a comeback?

No, I don’t believe so. I find the word thural redundant and believe just saying ‘burn herbs’ or ‘burn incense’ is clear enough. It is still and interesting word to add to your list if you are writing historical fiction or have a time travelling character who isn’t up-to-date with modern language.

Old Word Friday: Senticous

Hello World Out There World!

All right, so this week is on OWF we aren’t going to be focusing on a forgotten word. This week I thought I would share with you a old word from my favourites list that I’ve used in regular conversation, and in turn have heard this word spoken by others familiar with it. So, with that said this week’s word is senticous, which is an adjective (a describing word) that was created around the 1650’s. The word senticous means ‘prickly or thorny’.

How do you pronounce senticous?

SENT – EI – CUS

Examples of using senticous in a sentence:

There is an senticous rose bush behind my house.

Or…

The old man across the street is known to be senticous.

Or…

I went to the grocery store and decided I wanted to buy a senticous pear.

Should we use this word more frequently?

Yes, I love this word. How it sounds and what it means come together in perfect unity. I have used this word while I’m gardening, or when I wish to insult someone for having a senticous personality. It is a fancy words… but for whatever reason it makes me feel good whenever I speak it. I want it to be used more frequently just so more people will know what I’m saying. ^.^

Old Word Friday: Resarciate

Hello World Out There World!

This week on OWF I bring you resarciate. This word was created around the 1656 and reached pique popularity one year later in 1657. I’m sure this word is used today, not saying that any of the words I have posted thus far aren’t in use, but it isn’t commonly used or used in popularity. Hence it being on the OWF posts.

Now, that that is out of my system let’s learn a little more about the word resarciate. The word is a verb (action, state, or occurrence) and means ‘to mend or to make amends’.

How do you pronounce resarciate?

RE-SAR-SEE-ATE

Examples of this word in a sentence:

I want to resarciate my problems before they get too far out of hand.

Or…

My sister wants to resarciate her relationship before it’s too late.

Or…

My mother told me it was better to resarciate then let things fester.

Should this word make a come back?

When it comes to the word resarciate I could see it being used in a more educational setting, like in schools – specifically a private school setting. I could also see this word being popular in more European countries but not in North America. The word sounds like something those in a higher institution would be using to discuss politics. I do like the word and will likely use it in my future books but in everyday conversation with a stranger on the street I’ll continue to use the words that make up its definition.

Old Word Friday: Quibble & Quibbleism

Hello World Out There World!

This week’s old word forgotten by history is quibbleism. Now, before I explain to you what this word is I’ll have to explain to you what quibble is. Quibble is the act of arguing or raising objections to something. It is a verb and you would have likely hear this word in literature during 1830-1900. Quibbleism is a noun that means ‘the practice of quibbling’. This word was used during 1836 and died off around the beginnings of the 1900s.

How are these words pronounced:

KWI – BELL

KWI-BELL-IS-MM

Examples of these words in a sentence:

The old man liked to quibble with his neighbours.

Or…

There is always a lot of quibbling going on at the courthouse.

Or…

The young lawyer’s quibbleism earned his client a retrial.

Should this word make a comeback?

Asides from it being a fun word to say I don’t think it would make a return to the common language use of today. If someone is writing a book based around 1800-1900 then it would make sense to use this word. A writer may even find the word useful if they are trying to portray a Sherlock Holmes type character. In the end, I do not see this word returning but that isn’t going to stop me from using it. 🙂

Old Word Friday: Privign

Hello World Out There World!

This weeks old word is privign. Now, this word is a noun that was used mostly between 1605 all the way to 1654. Privign is a fancier way of saying stepson… why they had to make a fancier term for stepson I don’t know but that’s what this weeks word means.

How to pronounce this weeks word:

PRI-VINE

Examples of using privign in a sentence:

He was looking forward to gaining a privign after he married the love of his life.

Or…

The woman was known to not be so kind to her privign.

Or…

Their privign was treated more like a housekeeper than one of their children.

Should this would be brought back?

I think if you are writing historical fiction or getting together with your steampunk buddies for an adventure around town this word would make more sense to use… but to use it in common, everyday conversation – no. Like many of the words I do in this segment privign is a fun word to say but it’s one that would take more explaining than it would to just say stepson. This doesn’t mean I won’t use it but I doubt it is going to make a comeback. 🙂

OLD WORD FRIDAY: Ossifragant

Hello World Out There World!

This weeks OWF is ossifragant, which is a adjective founded around 1656.

The word ossifragant means, ‘bone-breaking’.

How you pronounce the word is:

O – SIF -RAG -ANT

Examples of using ossifragant in a sentence:

She heard the ossifragant noise of her hand when the shelf felt on top of her.

Or…

He was known for his ossifragant blow.

Should this word come back?

Nope. I think this word should stay dead as the word ossifragant doesn’t have the same gut wrenching feeling as bone-breaking. Unless you have a character that uses big words that no one is meant to comprehend, then don’t use this word. It is hard to set in a sentence without it sounding strange and it isn’t a word that is easy to read. If you are saying ossifragant in regular, everyday conversation no one is going to get what you’re saying and you’ll probably end up having to explain it – losing the whole feeling for what you are trying to say. I’m not going to lie, I find this word sounds pretty but bone-breaking isn’t supposed to sound pretty or poetic… so the word in my opinion doesn’t work with what it means. At the end of the day this word died for a reason and should stay buried.

Old Word Friday: NOSCIBLE

Today’s Old Word Friday is noscible.

Noscible is an adjective that was used mostly around 1654. The word isn’t as noscible as it was back then and so that’s why it finds itself on this list of forgettable old words.

If you haven’t guess the meaning of the word from the last sentence noscible pretty much means ‘knowable or something well-known’. Now that previous sentence probably makes a lot more sense.

How to pronounce the word:

NO – SIB – LE

Should this word come back?

I think so. It is a good word and I love how it sounds in sentences. Noscible, when used correctly, sounds like the word you are wanting to use. It also has a similar sound to noticeable… which is possibly why this word would work in modern conversation. I know I’ll be trying to use it in my regular conversations from now on… but I think by now people expect me to have a old style vocabulary. XD

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