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Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

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Old Word Friday: Thural

Hello World Out There World!

As the winter holiday’s are drawing closer we are starting to fill our houses with all kinds of wonderful smells. Right now, with all the baking I’ve been doing my house smells of apple and baked goods. This led me to looking for a word to add to my collection which I could use instead of candle but it turns out I found a word pertaining to incense instead. This week’s OWF is brought to you by thural, an adjective (descriptive word) that was created around 1624. The word thural means ‘of or pertaining to incense’.

So, how is this word pronounced?

THUR- AL

Examples of this word in a sentence:

Every Christmas our house is filled with thural herbs like cinnamon, sage, and thyme.

Or…

The thural smells of clove filled the kitchen.

Or…

I love whenever I burn thural herbs as it makes my house smell amazing.

Should this word make a comeback?

No, I don’t believe so. I find the word thural redundant and believe just saying ‘burn herbs’ or ‘burn incense’ is clear enough. It is still and interesting word to add to your list if you are writing historical fiction or have a time travelling character who isn’t up-to-date with modern language.

Old Word Friday: Senticous

Hello World Out There World!

All right, so this week is on OWF we aren’t going to be focusing on a forgotten word. This week I thought I would share with you a old word from my favourites list that I’ve used in regular conversation, and in turn have heard this word spoken by others familiar with it. So, with that said this week’s word is senticous, which is an adjective (a describing word) that was created around the 1650’s. The word senticous means ‘prickly or thorny’.

How do you pronounce senticous?

SENT – EI – CUS

Examples of using senticous in a sentence:

There is an senticous rose bush behind my house.

Or…

The old man across the street is known to be senticous.

Or…

I went to the grocery store and decided I wanted to buy a senticous pear.

Should we use this word more frequently?

Yes, I love this word. How it sounds and what it means come together in perfect unity. I have used this word while I’m gardening, or when I wish to insult someone for having a senticous personality. It is a fancy words… but for whatever reason it makes me feel good whenever I speak it. I want it to be used more frequently just so more people will know what I’m saying. ^.^

OLD WORD FRIDAY: Ossifragant

Hello World Out There World!

This weeks OWF is ossifragant, which is a adjective founded around 1656.

The word ossifragant means, ‘bone-breaking’.

How you pronounce the word is:

O – SIF -RAG -ANT

Examples of using ossifragant in a sentence:

She heard the ossifragant noise of her hand when the shelf felt on top of her.

Or…

He was known for his ossifragant blow.

Should this word come back?

Nope. I think this word should stay dead as the word ossifragant doesn’t have the same gut wrenching feeling as bone-breaking. Unless you have a character that uses big words that no one is meant to comprehend, then don’t use this word. It is hard to set in a sentence without it sounding strange and it isn’t a word that is easy to read. If you are saying ossifragant in regular, everyday conversation no one is going to get what you’re saying and you’ll probably end up having to explain it – losing the whole feeling for what you are trying to say. I’m not going to lie, I find this word sounds pretty but bone-breaking isn’t supposed to sound pretty or poetic… so the word in my opinion doesn’t work with what it means. At the end of the day this word died for a reason and should stay buried.

Old Word Friday: Cacozealous

This weeks OWF is cacozealous. This adjective was created and mostly used between 1656-1696. The word means to imitate badly or something that is poorly affected.

Examples of this word in a sentence are:

The student’s cacozealous attempt of impersonating their teacher was in terrible taste.

Or…

They were cacozealous by the bad weather.

….

I understand how this word could have faded away over the years. It is awkward to use in sentences and has a hard time working in conjunction with other words. I would suggest using this word in a minimal way, or to spice up a sentence instead of using imitated badly or poorly affected. This is one word though, I would like not want to see make a come back.

 

Old Word Friday: Rawgabbit

For this Friday’s old word I’ll introduce you to the word rawgabbit. Rawgabbit is a person that gossips in secret about things they have no knowledge about. Everyone knows someone who’s like this, at least I know I’ve know a few people that have done this… and I’ll admit when I was a teenager I had moments of being a rawgabbit – something I’m not proud of.

To give you an example of a rawgabbit – they are a person that will pull you aside and speak about other people doing things that are utterly untrue. They are starters of rumours and they can cause problems for other people if those they gossip to end up spreading these untruths about.

Examples of rawgabbit in a sentence:

Sally knew that Frank was a rawgabbit after he spoke about Miss. Alison’s relationship with the gym teacher.

Or…

“Stop being such a rawgabbit!” My mother ordered, silencing my muttering the moment her glare caught my eye.

 

Now, I find this word very useful in character development. If you don’t know how to describe a gossipy character this word pretty-much sums them up. You can also use it as an insult as no one likes to be called a liar and a gossip.

 

Old Word Friday: Snottor

For this Friday I choose the word snottor which from what I’ve read pertains to an old English word meaning ‘wise’. I like the potential imagery this word can give when used as a description. When I read snottor I think of someone older with their nose up in the air about the goings on around them. I don’t know… it’s a strange sounding word and has recently been added to words I want to use in my writing.

Ways to use snottor:

Caldor glared up from his book. As much as Liora didn’t want to ask him the man was snottor.

Or…

As she entered the large inner chamber of the library on the second floor of the Glass Tower, Liora couldn’t help but notice all the beady eyes from those hidden within. These men were snottors just like her mentor but she wasn’t sure if they would even consider answering her questions.

 

ACTUALLY I take it all back… I can’t take this word seriously enough to use it in my book. It makes me laugh whenever I read it. XD

Old Word Friday: Elflock

 

This word is a magical sounding word for something as simple as tangled hair. That is literally what an elflock is… it is a description word for tangled hair. Imagine little elves tangling your hair when you sleep… hence the origin of the word.

Sentences using elflock:

The wind wrapped elflocks blew across her face.

Or…

I woke up this morning with so many elflocks I broke my comb.

 

Old Word Friday: Fudgel

 

Fudgel is the act of appearing to do work when really you aren’t doing anything at all. I think many of us can agree… this is the perfect word for a Friday since no one really wants to do anything before the weekend.

Ways to uses fudgel in a sentence:

All I did was fudgel all day long.

Or…

The boss noticed his new employee fudgeling at his desk.

 

Fudgel         Fudgeling       Fudgeler

Old Word Friday: Bedward

 

That’s right, there is a word called bedward. Like edward + B.

Basically, bedward means to head to bed.

How to use bedward in a sentence:

After a long day at work I’m bedward.

Or…

When the children were done brushing their teeth they were ushered bedward.

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