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Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

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overthinking

Does a big ego help or hinder writers?

This week’s question is: does a big ego help or hinder writers?

I usually stay neutral with questions like this but today I’m going to choose a side. That side is, I believe it hinders a writer.

Now, to understand this question we need to know what an ego is. According to the grandmaster of search engines, Google describes ego as:

ego

I have a mild ego. One that has enough self-esteem to know I’m worthy of the life I have, and a desire to strive for something better but I don’t think I’m the “greatest” person in the world that can be the only person that can make the world “amazing” and everyone should listen to me. In other words I’m not a narcissistic Cheeto but an average human being.

This average view of myself helps me stay neutral when it comes to judging my writing, and I also don’t raise myself up on a pedestal to preach how great I am to the masses… I think the world has enough of that at the moment. I think having a average ego helps me as a writer because I don’t belittle others striving towards their goals. If anything I’m more willing to help where I can and share my experiences.

There is a downside to having an average ego though…

I, at times, don’t know my worth, which allows others to take advantage of me. Someone with a large ego is more likely to know their worth… maybe even surpass their worth because of their view of their own self-importance. This could help them with getting noticed but can also hinder them with burning bridges.

The best authors, in my opinion, are those that are average egos.

They release their worth and they use it to better others. J.K. Rowling – yes, I use her a lot for examples – is the perfect fit for this example. She knows what it is like to be at the bottom of the income ladder. When she became famous for her series she didn’t let that fame go to her head, and instead used the money that she had and influence that she gained to better others around her. You could say the same about Bill Gates. He knows how powerful he is and he is using that power to help others not help himself.

I think someone with a high ego wouldn’t do well within the writing community. Okay, maybe at first… but other time their inflated sense of self-importance and arrogance towards those around them may cause their popularity to fade.

So, as much as a big ego goes it may help a writer in the short term but hinder them in the long term.

What do you think? Do you think a big ego hurts a writer or helps them? Put your answer in the comment section down below, I love hearing your answers. Until next time remember to stay safe, be creative, and as always Toodles! ^.^

What are common traps for aspiring writers?

 

The most common traps for aspiring authors that come to my mind are three things:

  1. If I write it they will come.
  2. Everyone will love my book.
  3. No one will want my book, so what’s the point.

These are the three I’ve faced and the three I believe I’ve gotten past since completing my second book. When you are new to the writing game there is very little guidance and most of the work you have to be willing to do.

If I write it they will come – is such a common trap.

The reason for this is due to most aspiring writers approaching their writing from the wrong angle. You are looking at it from a readers standpoint not a writers stand point. As a reader you found a book on a shelf that you liked and in a sense that author did make it and attracted you to the work. But, new writers don’t see the middle part.

Authors spend just as much time figuring out ways to attract the reader to their book as they do writing it. They didn’t just make the book and wait for people to find it, most authors – at least the successful ones – had a plan to get people to read their books through marketing it or getting out there to show their face at certain events. I am still learning this part and trying to figure out a way to reach the people I know would enjoy my books. Being an author is equal parts marketing to equal parts writing. At least that’s what I have found.

This follows with – everyone will love my book.

A very unrealistic point of view. You love your book because you wrote it. You love your book because you created the story and put in the hours making it. Just because you love your work doesn’t mean everyone will love it. Not everyone reads the same thing.

For example: I love writing fantasy but I don’t enjoy reading them. I love historical non-fiction and memoirs mostly… that is when I find time to read.

You have to approach writing realistically and with some idea who you want to market your book to. Age, gender, location, interests… etc., these are all things to consider when thinking of who your reader is going to be and who may love your book.

The same goes with – no one will want my book, so what’s the point.

Just like not everyone will love your book, not everyone is going to hate it either. You wrote a book or short story or poem that you needed to write. Something inside you called to you and said, the world needs this. That same voice is the reason why there will be people who will love your writing. Someone out there needs what you’ve written, and you may never meet them but they are there. The world is a big place with 7 billion people and there will be those that will not like your work but there will be just as many who will love it. You can’t be afraid of those few for the possible many that will embrace your creation.

So, in conclusion:

Always think of ways to engage your potential readers, (maybe start a blog like I did), or become part of a writing guild in your community to learn and get to know other creators.

Not everyone is going to love your creation as much as you will. It is your baby and in that sense you see it through rose coloured glasses. Get someone you trust to review your work and see if there are places where you can make your piece stronger. Also never be afraid of criticism; take it as a chance to grow.

At the same time, not everyone is going to hate what you create. Explore places where those that might enjoy your work may be hanging out either online or in the real world. Try sharing your talents in small ways to build your confidence and maybe your following. Who knows? Your work may touch more people than you could have imagined.

Until next time remember to stay safe, be creative, and as always toodles! ^.^

 

 

Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Hello Everyone!

For whatever reason my new save didn’t take and all you were able to see was ‘do a recording’. So, in case this was a technical error I will have to resort back to typing for the time being until I figure out what the problem with my recorder is.

Now, this week’s question is: Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Simple answer:

It depends.

More complicated answer:

It depends on what I am writing that could cause the difference in my energy levels. When I write something I’m passionate about like my book series or short stories I get a boost of energy. This is likely due to the increase of adrenaline I get from being excited about working on a project I’m passionate about.

If I am writing something more technical that requires more research and time, or it is a work project I have to do that I have no desire to work on my energy level decreases leaving me exhausted. I will complete the project but I will likely be bored during its completion process.

Most of the time when I write though I am doing it for my own enjoyment and not for work. In that sense the majority of the time I am energized when I’m writing. Like at the moment, as I am writing this blog post, I am energized because:

  1. I have adrenaline running through my system from the excitement of writing something to share with you.
  2. I have oxytocin running through my veins because of the possible human interaction I will have with all of you who read this, (and for those that don’t know oxytocin is the hormone responsible for that happy feeling you get from a hug or from getting a like on Facebook – this is also why writing can become an addiction).

With the combination of these two coursing through my veins it is hard to not be energized when writing. I’m excited to hear from you about what writing does to you. Let me know in the comment section down below. Until next time remember to stay safe, be creative, and as always toodles!

 

 

Where do I get my ideas?

Hello World Out There World!

Today’s Thinking Thursday I’m focusing on a question that I get on a regular basis.

Where do I get my ideas?

When it comes to growing my ideas for my books or short stories I know many of you expect me to say something along the lines of, “It came to me in a dream” or “Some television show inspired me to write this.”

The truth is… it is both of those and more.

I could be walking down the street and an idea pops into my head… usually in a ‘what if’ sort of question. I could be eating lunch, listening to a song I never heard before, talking to my peers, standing in my shower, sitting on the bus, volunteering at the ARTS Project… be anywhere and doing anything when an idea pops into my head.

imaginary.pngI consider myself lucky. My parents (especially my mother) made sure to embrace and
grow my creative side. When I was a kid I had an overactive imagination and even had moments where I mixed fantasy with reality – most people would call that ‘make-believe’. As I got older I worked hard to keep that creative imagination in me alive. I did this through writing and not being afraid to explore my mind through creative expression. This made it easier when I became an adult to tap into my creative mind to find new ideas for things or what some people may call ‘thinking outside the box’ for solutions.

Now that I’m 25 (soon to be 26) I am able to tap into my creative mind whenever I want. When something inspires me my brain is the first one to react with an overflowing amount of questions. When I want to create something it usually takes me a couple of minutes to find something to explore creatively.

Yes, this gives me an advantage but at the same time I can easily burn myself out. When my brain is in this continuous drive to create there are moments it reboots or shuts down… and this can last for days even weeks. People would call this writers block… and I call it annoying. I’m used to the overflow of thought always going on in my head and when there is this sudden silence due to creative burnout I’m at a loss. The silence is eerie… and so I do what I can to avoid that burnout as often as possible through taking regular breaks or even suppressing my desire to create.

So, where do I get my writing ideas?

From everywhere and anything that makes my brain tingle. Usually EDM or Netflix is guaranteed to give me some creative ideas. I also like learning new things which leads me to finding creative ways to explore what I’ve learned.

Everyone has their own way of discovering what ideas they want and where they can get them. If you are having trouble at the moment, don’t worry, relax and the ideas will come.

Until next time remember to stay safe, be creative, and as always toodles! ^.^

 

Thinking Thursdays: I read your book…

To me… that is the most horrifying and yet more exciting words in my life right now. Horrifying because I have no idea what they think about my book. Exciting because, hey – someone read my book!

It is even worse when it is someone you are working with because you will see them day in
and day out, thinking what they thought of your book. If they read your book and told younotsureifenjoyed that they enjoyed it you find yourself thinking, “did they really enjoy it or are they just being nice?” I mean, they have no reason to lie to you but at the same time maybe they are just being nice because they are going to see you everyday and don’t want you being reminded that they are the person that hates your book. At the same time you may get those readers that talk to you about your book but talk in such a way that you don’t know if they enjoyed it or not. They compliment the book but fit in suggestions on where it could have been better… avoiding stating what their opinion is about your work and leaving you trying to decode their words.

Maybe it is the socially awkward introvert in me? Maybe I’m not giving myself enough credit because I can see every time I re-read my work where I can improve? I don’t know… but I shouldn’t be focusing on the negative. If anything, I should be focusing on the fact that I got one more person outside of my family and friends to read my book. This is one more person that can suggest to other people who are looking for something to read to read my book.

Don’t get me wrong – I enjoy hearing people say those words. I’m excited to hear what people thought or where I can improve in the next book. There is a sense of completion that comes when you hear those words and it sinks in every time some says those words that you actually wrote a book people are reading.

I don’t know… am I alone with this or do others feel the same way? Let me know in the comments below! 🙂

Thinking Thursdays: Research & Writing

Hello World Out There World!
This week I’m tackling the question: How important is research to you when writing a book?
I went into some little detail regarding this question on my author interview with Serious Reading a while back but I thought I’d dive in deeper. So, here we go!

Depending on the topic I could spend 10 minutes to 10 weeks researching. When it comes to my blog posts, most of what I write is opinion based and therefore doesn’t have a lot of facts required. Not saying what I’m writing on my blogs I didn’t research… it is just what I’ve written on here is my formulated opinion on the things I’ve read online or formed after having conversations with others interested in these topics.

What I usually spend time researching is what I’ll be using in my books. I want to be able to share correct information with my readers… as I believe if I am going to have people read my work it should be close to accurate as possible. People learn from reading and I don’t want to be sharing the wrong information. At the same time, I am no close to being an expert as Trump is at being a good President. I do not claim to know all the science behind natural health practices. I do not claim to be an expert in medieval history or military tactics. I’ve read books, I’ve made notes and those notes I use in my work. At the same time, I have to trust that the information that I’ve read is correct. For all I know the six books I’ve read could be a creation of someones opinion and not based in fact at all.

That’s one reason why I love writing fictions because as much as I may have truth weaved between the words my writing doesn’t have to be taken as truth. I could include actual ointment recipes or how to make your own tea within the pages of my book but at the same time not be taken completely seriously because of the fact my characters ride magical creatures and shoot lightening bolts from their fingertips, (all right maybe not lightening bolts… but you get the point).

Research is important. Most writers understand and know this. Most writers want to come across as competent in their craft and at times fear about being corrected or called a hack for not getting something right in their books. I know I have the fear and that is why I spend the time exploring the subjects I include in my books I’m not familiar with like naturopathy, botany, and medieval combat. As much as my world is based in fantasy it is my research that helps ground my readers in some kind of twisted, relatable reality.

Am I the only one to think this or are there some writers out there that feel the same way? Am I doing too much research or is this common for writers to feel this way? I’d like to know your opinion on this matter, so don’t be afraid to leave a comment in the area below.
Remember stay safe, be creative and until next time – Toodles! o^.^o

 

 

 

 

Diary of a Socially Awkward Introvert: Parties

To you parties may sound like a fun word.

For me or anyone like me… it instantly raises our blood pressure.

Introverts aren’t the type of people that like to party or being in a group of strangers. We are people that want to Netflix with their best friends and eat junk food, or stay at home and play games online.

When an introvert is dragged out to a party they are doing it because:

One – they want to make a good impression on a friend.

Two – they want to get out of their comfort zone.

Three – didn’t know that they were going to be going to the party in the first place.

Social situations can be very tiring and stressful for an introvert, add in being socially awkward and you have yourself a panic stricken blubber ball.

When I somehow find myself at parties – usually dragged out of the house by friends – I do one of four things.

One – cling to my friend like a baby koala for the whole night.

Two – nervously talk your way through questions asked to you by strangers while trying to locate the friend that dragged you to the party.

Three – locate the food. No one will talk to you if you have food in your mouth.

Four – hang out with the pet of the house cat, dog, bird… doesn’t matter. (You know they won’t judge you).

My usually choice is three. There always something at the food table that I like and it is easy to ignore people when your back it facing the crowd and you are facing the food. It is also easier to play off people’s questions when you have a mouthful of food.

If – Gods forbid – a person catches you away from the food table and starts asking me questions I usually am able to stumble my way through a conversation with them. If a person expects me to start a conversation… well they will be waiting a very long time since while it may take them a second to think of something to ask me I’m running through hundreds of possible suggestions, each being reviewed for any possible negative responses, while my mind is preparing responses to those negative responses.

Fun? Not really. Stressful? Totally.

Another fun thing is when you finally settle on something to say and it comes out wrong. The joys of your cursing yourself as you try to recover the conversation as you notice the person you are talking to staring at you… possibly thinking what is wrong with this person.

Scurry away, back to the food table where you are safe little over-thinker. It will be okay.

Or, will it?

The chances are, that interaction will be playing over and over again in my head for the rest of the night. It will haunt my dreams and whisper in my ear while I’m drinking my tea at breakfast. I may even do mock conversations on how I should have responded to the person while in the shower before heading to work.

Am I crazy? Yep… but admitting it is the first step to recovery… right? ^.^

I am find with small interactions with people on the street. Someone asking for directions or asking the time are fine. I can even handle being in a small group of four people that I know. I’m part of several communities and volunteer… so I am not completely useless. I just know that after a long day in the office or working with my volunteer groups I will be tired.

While people go out to dance or party to boost their energy or cut loose… I read and write books.

So, when you ask one of your friends if they want to go out to party or stay in and watch a movie – consider that maybe their way of fun doesn’t include a lot of people and that wanting to spend time with you is a big step outside of their usual comfort zone.

Until next time stay safe, be creative and as always toodles!

Diary of a Socially Awkward Introvert: Compliments

The other day when I was sitting on the bus, heading home from a long day of work and a short stint of shopping, I noticed something bright blue out of the corner of my eye. As I turned I could see it was a young woman – probably close to my age – in a hijab sipping her coffee. The bright blue material matched her outfit really well and a part of my felt like I wanted to compliment her.

As I was about to open my mouth to say something, there came a voice, very faint in the back of my mind, “Don’t do it. She might think there’s something wrong with you.”

No, I think she would really like a compliment. Everybody likes compliments,” I retorted my own internal police but that didn’t stop them.

What if you stumble your words like you usually do with strangers, huh? Maybe she will take your compliment in a wrong way. Think about her position. She’s sipping her tea and relaxing… then you break that peace by talking to her. Don’t do it… it isn’t worth this list I prepared to deter you.” At that point my brain – being the jerk that it is – listed off a hundred scenarios making me settle back down into my seat.

I was given a second chance to complete the Compliment Quest when I reached my stop. It turned out the young woman in the beautiful blue hijab was getting off at the same stop. We were standing beside each other at the door, perfect time for me to say something but instead my mind was running hundreds of things I should say… rewording the compliment, figuring out ways to not come across as weird, preparing come-backs if the girl got upset.

We got off the bus and I crossed the street by 124d2gthe time my brain was satisfied with what I was going to say to her… but the opportunity was miss. She crossed the street and I was left cursing myself for being afraid to say anything while being plagued with the worry that she had noticed me staring at her and being given all the thoughts she may have been thinking about me staring.

Looking back at it now, I feel stupid for even overthinking that situation. Who would get angry at a compliment? No one, that’s who! Yet my brain decided to work overtime like it was the Enigma Machine trying to decode Nazi bombing coordinates.

The problem is I’m an amiable person… which means I’m not only a friendly person but I hate conflicts of all kinds. That means if there is potential for conflict I avoid it or try to help others avoid it at all cost. This also means that my brain considers the possibility of everything being a conflict and tries to come up with solutions to solving these possible, unrealistic, nonexistent conflicts… which sucks!

This problem doesn’t just occur when I want to say anything nice to someone but also when someone says something nice to me. First, I stiffen up because now someone is giving me attention and I hate being centred out. This engages my brain who is reminding me of my unnatural stance and it tells me that the person I’m talking to thinks I’m
strange for reacting that way… which makes me try to be calm which only makes me act weirder. Second, I have no idea what I’m supposed to say when given a compliment – which I’m trying to find an answer for while trying to act natural while trying to avoid upsetting the person that complimented me. My brain starts asking itself questions like: do I say thank you? And before I get the chance to say thank you my words are choked out by my brain’s answer: Wouldn’t thank you be too basic? And these thoughts just continue on facepalm-meme-17and on making a silence grow to an awkward length but I’m not paying attention to time because my brain is continuing it’s useless debate with itself. If I say no problem that would sound narcissistic or belittling to the person giving me the compliment. No reply would just be rude and smiling/nodding would just be weird. It is only after catching onto my complimenters body language do I realise I’ve made the situation awkward and from that point I spout out a very uncomfortable and not confident, ‘Thank you’. And if that’s just not cringe worthy enough I end it with a nervous laugh.

Be happy you aren’t in my brain. Be happy you don’t over analyse every social interaction you have with people. This is why introverts are tired after hanging out with a group and also why it takes something really important for them to leave the comfort of their home. Be glad you aren’t a socially awkward introvert… and if you are at least now you know you aren’t alone. 🙂

 

 

Thinking Thursdays: What Inspires You?

Hello World Out There World!

Today on Thinking Thursday we are covering the question: What inspires you?

This question I’ve covered a while back but for those of you who are new to this blog I’ll answer this question in this post.

When it comes to being inspired I would have to say a lot of things inspire me. It all depends on my mood, and the environment. Old projects inspire me, things people say inspire me, or certain images inspire me.

As of late I’ve been watching a lot of Netflix and there have been a few shows that have opened my mind to new ideas. Touch, a show about a boy that sees the world in numbers has given me knew ideas on abilities people could have. American Crime, a show about a family dealing with the murder of their son with a major twist has given me ideas on how to approach modern crime short stories.

Today what has inspired me to work/ write is not only obligation (as I need to stick with updating this blog more regularly) but also discovering old projects. I’ve been transferring a lot of old writing pieces over to my new desktop and found some stories that I thought I lost or deleted. I’m happy to say that didn’t happen and more than thrilled to be able to tackle some of these old projects. Not only does it help me remember a time when creative writing was easier for me but also I can improve on the stories that I had written now with a better writing approach.

At the end of the day it really depends on if I’m looking to be creative or not. Most of the time when I’m not looking for a way to become inspired inspiration finds me. I don’t know if this is the same for any of you… I would like to hear from you on what inspires you.

Now, I have to finish up dinner and get back to editing book two. Maybe I’ll even take a break and check out The Sun Child – the short book series I started back in high school. Who knows, I may have more than Prophecy Six to share with the world.

Until next time – Toodles!!

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