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Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

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things to consider

Does a big ego help or hinder writers?

This week’s question is: does a big ego help or hinder writers?

I usually stay neutral with questions like this but today I’m going to choose a side. That side is, I believe it hinders a writer.

Now, to understand this question we need to know what an ego is. According to the grandmaster of search engines, Google describes ego as:

ego

I have a mild ego. One that has enough self-esteem to know I’m worthy of the life I have, and a desire to strive for something better but I don’t think I’m the “greatest” person in the world that can be the only person that can make the world “amazing” and everyone should listen to me. In other words I’m not a narcissistic Cheeto but an average human being.

This average view of myself helps me stay neutral when it comes to judging my writing, and I also don’t raise myself up on a pedestal to preach how great I am to the masses… I think the world has enough of that at the moment. I think having a average ego helps me as a writer because I don’t belittle others striving towards their goals. If anything I’m more willing to help where I can and share my experiences.

There is a downside to having an average ego though…

I, at times, don’t know my worth, which allows others to take advantage of me. Someone with a large ego is more likely to know their worth… maybe even surpass their worth because of their view of their own self-importance. This could help them with getting noticed but can also hinder them with burning bridges.

The best authors, in my opinion, are those that are average egos.

They release their worth and they use it to better others. J.K. Rowling – yes, I use her a lot for examples – is the perfect fit for this example. She knows what it is like to be at the bottom of the income ladder. When she became famous for her series she didn’t let that fame go to her head, and instead used the money that she had and influence that she gained to better others around her. You could say the same about Bill Gates. He knows how powerful he is and he is using that power to help others not help himself.

I think someone with a high ego wouldn’t do well within the writing community. Okay, maybe at first… but other time their inflated sense of self-importance and arrogance towards those around them may cause their popularity to fade.

So, as much as a big ego goes it may help a writer in the short term but hinder them in the long term.

What do you think? Do you think a big ego hurts a writer or helps them? Put your answer in the comment section down below, I love hearing your answers. Until next time remember to stay safe, be creative, and as always Toodles! ^.^

What are common traps for aspiring writers?

 

The most common traps for aspiring authors that come to my mind are three things:

  1. If I write it they will come.
  2. Everyone will love my book.
  3. No one will want my book, so what’s the point.

These are the three I’ve faced and the three I believe I’ve gotten past since completing my second book. When you are new to the writing game there is very little guidance and most of the work you have to be willing to do.

If I write it they will come – is such a common trap.

The reason for this is due to most aspiring writers approaching their writing from the wrong angle. You are looking at it from a readers standpoint not a writers stand point. As a reader you found a book on a shelf that you liked and in a sense that author did make it and attracted you to the work. But, new writers don’t see the middle part.

Authors spend just as much time figuring out ways to attract the reader to their book as they do writing it. They didn’t just make the book and wait for people to find it, most authors – at least the successful ones – had a plan to get people to read their books through marketing it or getting out there to show their face at certain events. I am still learning this part and trying to figure out a way to reach the people I know would enjoy my books. Being an author is equal parts marketing to equal parts writing. At least that’s what I have found.

This follows with – everyone will love my book.

A very unrealistic point of view. You love your book because you wrote it. You love your book because you created the story and put in the hours making it. Just because you love your work doesn’t mean everyone will love it. Not everyone reads the same thing.

For example: I love writing fantasy but I don’t enjoy reading them. I love historical non-fiction and memoirs mostly… that is when I find time to read.

You have to approach writing realistically and with some idea who you want to market your book to. Age, gender, location, interests… etc., these are all things to consider when thinking of who your reader is going to be and who may love your book.

The same goes with – no one will want my book, so what’s the point.

Just like not everyone will love your book, not everyone is going to hate it either. You wrote a book or short story or poem that you needed to write. Something inside you called to you and said, the world needs this. That same voice is the reason why there will be people who will love your writing. Someone out there needs what you’ve written, and you may never meet them but they are there. The world is a big place with 7 billion people and there will be those that will not like your work but there will be just as many who will love it. You can’t be afraid of those few for the possible many that will embrace your creation.

So, in conclusion:

Always think of ways to engage your potential readers, (maybe start a blog like I did), or become part of a writing guild in your community to learn and get to know other creators.

Not everyone is going to love your creation as much as you will. It is your baby and in that sense you see it through rose coloured glasses. Get someone you trust to review your work and see if there are places where you can make your piece stronger. Also never be afraid of criticism; take it as a chance to grow.

At the same time, not everyone is going to hate what you create. Explore places where those that might enjoy your work may be hanging out either online or in the real world. Try sharing your talents in small ways to build your confidence and maybe your following. Who knows? Your work may touch more people than you could have imagined.

Until next time remember to stay safe, be creative, and as always toodles! ^.^

 

 

It Takes Time

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Sometimes when you have written/ published something you need to remind yourself that Rome wasn’t built in a day. Even though you’ve completed your book, published it, and have a readership interested in it you’re not going to sell a million copies overnight. That is an unrealistic goal. You should be happy if your book is selling. You should be happy that people have taken interest in your work but instead you’re overwhelmed – dare I say… apathetic.

200_sWith hearing stories, reading blog posts, or articles on people going viral with their writing it’s hard to accept that what you’ve done is good. Actually, before you continue reading this give yourself a pat on the back because you deserve it. You’ve gotten this far and be proud of what you’ve achieved. Not many have gotten to the place you are. Writing isn’t as easy as everyone thinks.

Now let’s continue.

The reason you may be so apathetic to what you’ve done is due to how society perceives achievement. Like in middle school or high school popularity in writing is what we writers view as success. Maze Runner, Game of Thrones, Twilight, Harry Potter, Divergent, and Hunger Games have made wanting to be a writer popular and some part of us wouldn’t mind having our characters become the next Thomas or Katniss.

But, not every piece of writing is going to be popular right away. Some Game of Thrones booktimes the best things in the world take time. Shakespeare took a lifetime to become one of the greatest writers of history. Da Vinci took years… heck centuries for his talents to be recognized. Stoner, Kafka, Catch-22 and other now popular books took years to be recognized (more books listed HERE). Even the popular books mentioned in the paragraph above weren’t main stream until later one in their careers – I’m talking about you GoT (Book 1 published 1996).

So, why are you apathetic towards the hard work you’ve done? Why do you perceive the books you’ve sold as a failure?

Firstly, lets look at the word failure. To fail is to not be successful and so in that sense if your goal was to have people read your book and you have a person or people reading your book then you are not a failure. An epic book fail would mean not getting any interest in your book. In all manner of the word your book is not a failure. If your book made 10 sales it wouldn’t be a failure. If your book made 1 sale is wouldn’t be a failure because there is one person in this world reading your book. One person is reading a story that wouldn’t ac6a516d6df74c2fb4d7d9e6a98c1e66have existed if you hadn’t written it. Therefore as long as you have made more than zero sales your book is not a failure! And hey, if you haven’t gotten anyone reading your book you didn’t fail. You learned something and you take what you’ve learned to make something better or improve upon what you have already made. We all fail at one point but what we choose to do with that failure is what really shows what type of person you are. Take this experience and learn from it – don’t let it destroy your passion or your confidence.

Eventually your book will grow a larger readership – if you continue writing and bringing attention to it. We all have to start somewhere but in the world of social media where we get instant results it’s hard to remind yourself that what you’re doing may take time. Rome wasn’t built in a day. Most books aren’t written in an afternoon. Most dreams do take a lifetime. Not everything is instant… not everything happens at once. This is what you’ll have to keep reminding yourself of when you look at your book. That in time its popularity may grow. That its message will be shared.

Honestly, as much as you may like the thought of your book becoming the next best-seller that shouldn’t be the reason and probably isn’t the reason you wrote this book in the first place. This is a story you wanted to share. These are topics, characters, ideas you wanted the world to read about. You should write for you and publish for you – not anyone else.

So, calm down and take a breath. Admire the work that you MontreGousset001have done and the beautiful piece of writing you’ve created. You need to remember why you wrote that book and wanted to share it with the world. It’s a story you love and in time there will be like-minded people who will love it too.

But at the moment you have to remember – it takes time.

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