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Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

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THINKING THURSDAYS

Thinking Thursdays: What’s my goal?

Hi ya’ll!

When it comes to writing we usually have a goal in mind. We want to be signed on with a big publishing company, we want to self-publish, we what to speak at conferences, or we want to build a supportive online community. Whatever your goal is the main point is you have a goal.

At the start of this journey I had no idea where I was going to end up but I did have a set of goals I wanted to reach. I wanted to grow my followers on my blog, I wanted to self-publish my first book in under a year, and I wanted to sell at least 100 copies of my first book. With the help of all of you I was able to reach these goals and in turn exceed them.

Now, as I approach the release date of Children of Sirphan (Dec 20th, 2016) I am reviewing the goals I set.

  1. Finish my second book
  2. Sell 200 copies
  3. Grow my followers on my blog more
  4. Take on a new challenge
  5. Create a professional author’s site

Well, I have finished book 2 and it awaits to be published and at the moment I can’t sell any of my books because they have not been released. I have also been growing my followers – where I’m almost at 700 which is fracking amazing – thank you, everyone!!

As for the challenge I have one idea up my sleeve. One is trying to get my YouTube channel up and running but it is figuring out what I want to talk about that’s the problem. I’m open to any suggestions if you have any. Type them in the comments down below!

I was able to create a author site though, and I have to say I’m quite proud of it. My favourite part is the header randomizes each time you reload a page. It’s the small details that really get me. You’re welcome to check it out if you wish, the link is right HERE.

It looks like I’ll have to make more goals for 2017… but right now I just need to focus on getting everything ready for Christmas.

Now, I pass the questions onto you. What are your goals for the New Year? Did you reach the goals you set for this year? Tell me in the comment section down below.

Until next time stay safe, be creative and as always toodles!

Thinking Thursdays: Why Do I Write?

Hello World Out There World!

This week’s Thinking Thursday is going to focus around why I write. Many people have their reasons as to why they put pen to paper. All writers are drawn to writing for their own reasons. Either, they felt a need to write down the story they have inside or they may do it because it comes naturally to them. But, today I want to focus on why after falling in love with writing 12 years ago why I’m still writing.

Short answer:

I love writing because it’s a part of me.

Long answer:

Writing has always helped me escape the real world and figure out ways I am able to approach real life challenges through exploration in a non-real life setting. I can test my ideas through my character interactions and find a way that works for me.

When I was a kid (age 10-13) I was an outsider.

As an only child in a school made up of kids with siblings I found it hard to relate to kids my own age. I was mature for my age and got along better with the teachers than I did with my classmates. This led to name calling like teachers pet, being ostracized from others in the schoolyard, and due to the fact most of the kids at my babysitters had single parents they tormented me because my parents were together.

I understand now that I’m an adult that they were taking out their pain on me. They saw how happy I was and how much people liked me so they thought taking me down a peg would make them feel better. I understand that I was awkward and strange… that I stood out and didn’t fit in so I was an easy target but them realizing that and making my life a living hell made me realize that they didn’t know that from the torture they put me through that I already knew I was the freak in the striped overalls or the girl that no one wanted to be friends with.

My torment happened before bullies were put on the school’s radar. When I was being tormented by my classmates the faculty said it was just, “kids being kids”. They said I was just too sensitive and needed to grow thicker skin. So, when I was pushed down the hill and impaled by a tree root, or the girls in the schoolyard pulled on my pigtails or made fun of my teeth it was ‘all in good fun’. The school system failed me… so I did what I could to survive.

I huddled myself by the front doors at

runningreality
Image Reference

recess with my book and read. When I had read everything I could and got tired of the same old happy endings or open endings I felt confident enough to start writing. Sure, I started writing to prove that I could write a better book than those I was reading but I soon realized that I was able to escape easier into a world of my own creation. My characters had the friends I couldn’t make in school. They were able to do things I would never be able to do. The world I wrote had no boundaries asides from the ones I put in place. While I was tortured in reality by classmates that bullied me to feel better about themselves I was able to hide myself away in a world that couldn’t harm me.

People liked me in my world. Challenges didn’t stand in my way because I could always find an answer and soon I realized how small everything outside of writing was. While I worked away on this dream of becoming a writer I started making friends that were passionate about writing or the arts – in high school. As I started to realize I wasn’t alone and wasn’t the only person that the school system failed I knew I wanted to make a bigger difference. I wanted to share what writing had done… what the creative programs in my life had done for me and others like me. I continued my passion of writing into university where soon it became clear that I didn’t need to write to escape anymore.

In university I had friends that liked my quirkiness and loved me for my bluntness. I could hang out with a mature crowd and not be made fun of for my opinions. I could be me and for once in my life I didn’t need a crutch.

Did I still write?

Sure I did… not as much but I wrote more non-fiction than fiction. My stories stuck in reality than flying off on the backs of gryphons to some medieval castle like I had when I was a child. I still had the drive to be a published author one day. I still told people one day I would be an author, but my life was focused on reality. I dreamed about being a teacher and sharing my experiences with my students. I wanted to tell them that things would get better and that if you are really passionate about something that the only person that is standing in your way is yourself. I wanted to tell them that the impossible is possible and that if you work hard enough your goals can become reality.

whisperreality
Image Reference

After school when my friends moved away and the focus of getting a job was looming over me I needed to find a way to escape. My dream of becoming a teacher wasn’t working out and no one was looking for someone with my teachable skill set for their schools… so instead of being sucked down into a depression I focused my emotions towards writing again. Not as obsessively as I did when I was a child but enough to distract myself from the looming feeling of failure to reach my career goal of becoming a teacher.

To me, writing is relaxing. Writing is a form of therapy where I can get whatever is on my mind off so I can move on. With school done and the realization of having to find a job I didn’t go to school for closing in I knew it was time to make my childhood dream a reality. I sketched out characters and the world I wanted the story to take place. I spent so much time planning, researching, and noting that I never got around to any actual writing. That was until my already crumbling reality suddenly shattered.

When my mother died I needed to escape. A coping strategy from when I was a kid. The real world got too much for me so I hide away within the pages of a world I had created. Those 6-7 months it took to write Child of the Light was enough time for me to work through the loss of the most influential person in my life. Her death pushed me to reach the goal I always put aside for other more ‘realistic’ endeavors. Her death made me take the risk I was always afraid to take.

When I held my first book in my hands I felt like I had done something right. I knew feeling the glossy cover gripped in my sweaty fingers that all that pain that started this journey helped me find my true purpose.

So, why do I write?

Writing gave me a place to escape when I was young and scared. It gave me a voice when I believed I didn’t have one. It helped me work through the problems in my life when I felt like I couldn’t talk to anyone about how I was feeling. Writing became a part of me just as much as the blood that runs through my veins or my heart that pumps in my chest. It has helped me survive all the challenges in my life and was able to show a scared little girl that she could do something when her peers were telling her she was nothing.

Anyways… let me know why you write in the comments down below. I’d love to hear your stories as to how you got started and why you still write. Remember to stay safe, be creative, and until next time – toodles! ^.^

Thinking Thursdays: I read your book…

To me… that is the most horrifying and yet more exciting words in my life right now. Horrifying because I have no idea what they think about my book. Exciting because, hey – someone read my book!

It is even worse when it is someone you are working with because you will see them day in
and day out, thinking what they thought of your book. If they read your book and told younotsureifenjoyed that they enjoyed it you find yourself thinking, “did they really enjoy it or are they just being nice?” I mean, they have no reason to lie to you but at the same time maybe they are just being nice because they are going to see you everyday and don’t want you being reminded that they are the person that hates your book. At the same time you may get those readers that talk to you about your book but talk in such a way that you don’t know if they enjoyed it or not. They compliment the book but fit in suggestions on where it could have been better… avoiding stating what their opinion is about your work and leaving you trying to decode their words.

Maybe it is the socially awkward introvert in me? Maybe I’m not giving myself enough credit because I can see every time I re-read my work where I can improve? I don’t know… but I shouldn’t be focusing on the negative. If anything, I should be focusing on the fact that I got one more person outside of my family and friends to read my book. This is one more person that can suggest to other people who are looking for something to read to read my book.

Don’t get me wrong – I enjoy hearing people say those words. I’m excited to hear what people thought or where I can improve in the next book. There is a sense of completion that comes when you hear those words and it sinks in every time some says those words that you actually wrote a book people are reading.

I don’t know… am I alone with this or do others feel the same way? Let me know in the comments below! 🙂

Thinking Thursdays: Avoiding Alliteration

Hello World Out There World!

If you have followed me for a while you will know that I love using alliteration. For those of you not in the know, alliteration is:

alliteration
Thanks Google! 🙂

Examples of alliteration would be this segment (Thinking Thursdays) or even the title for the post (Avoiding Alliteration). There are many people (writers mostly) who say that real writers don’t use alliteration. That is it lazy, not creative, and annoying. I don’t know why that is… I mean if Marvel uses alliteration it must been good, right?

When it comes to how I use alliteration I usually use it to emphasize something in a sentence, or draw a readers attention to certain details. Alliteration helps a reader recall a certain moment in the book later on, or connects a certain thing with a character. I also use alliteration to help with the flow of a sentence or cut down on unwanted word usage to get my point across.

Alliteration is a useful tool for a writer, just like the word said. Both forms are told to be ignored or removed but in small amounts they can help a story flow.

I love how people keep insisting that there are rules to writing… but in the end they are only guidelines to help you get started. In the end you will write the way you want with witty alliteration anyways.

But this is Thinking Thursday, so, I want to know what you think. Should writers avoid alliteration? Why or why not? Leave your answers in the comments below and until next time – toodles! o^.^o

Thinking Thursdays: Research & Writing

Hello World Out There World!
This week I’m tackling the question: How important is research to you when writing a book?
I went into some little detail regarding this question on my author interview with Serious Reading a while back but I thought I’d dive in deeper. So, here we go!

Depending on the topic I could spend 10 minutes to 10 weeks researching. When it comes to my blog posts, most of what I write is opinion based and therefore doesn’t have a lot of facts required. Not saying what I’m writing on my blogs I didn’t research… it is just what I’ve written on here is my formulated opinion on the things I’ve read online or formed after having conversations with others interested in these topics.

What I usually spend time researching is what I’ll be using in my books. I want to be able to share correct information with my readers… as I believe if I am going to have people read my work it should be close to accurate as possible. People learn from reading and I don’t want to be sharing the wrong information. At the same time, I am no close to being an expert as Trump is at being a good President. I do not claim to know all the science behind natural health practices. I do not claim to be an expert in medieval history or military tactics. I’ve read books, I’ve made notes and those notes I use in my work. At the same time, I have to trust that the information that I’ve read is correct. For all I know the six books I’ve read could be a creation of someones opinion and not based in fact at all.

That’s one reason why I love writing fictions because as much as I may have truth weaved between the words my writing doesn’t have to be taken as truth. I could include actual ointment recipes or how to make your own tea within the pages of my book but at the same time not be taken completely seriously because of the fact my characters ride magical creatures and shoot lightening bolts from their fingertips, (all right maybe not lightening bolts… but you get the point).

Research is important. Most writers understand and know this. Most writers want to come across as competent in their craft and at times fear about being corrected or called a hack for not getting something right in their books. I know I have the fear and that is why I spend the time exploring the subjects I include in my books I’m not familiar with like naturopathy, botany, and medieval combat. As much as my world is based in fantasy it is my research that helps ground my readers in some kind of twisted, relatable reality.

Am I the only one to think this or are there some writers out there that feel the same way? Am I doing too much research or is this common for writers to feel this way? I’d like to know your opinion on this matter, so don’t be afraid to leave a comment in the area below.
Remember stay safe, be creative and until next time – Toodles! o^.^o

 

 

 

 

Thinking Thursdays: Depression, Suicide and Writers (TW)

Hello World Out There World!

I am going to start off with stating that there is a Trigger Warning for this post. We will be discussing depression, suicide, and mental health in this post which may bother some of you or affect some of you. With that said, you have been warned.

The discussion below is a combination of two questions I was asked to answer during an author’s interview a few weeks back for Serious Reading and I thought that sharing some of what we discussed would be both something different and give you my view on these issues. If you want to read more of my interest with Serious Reading CLICK HERE.

All right, now that that is out of the way – let’s begin:

Writers are permanently depressed; how true is that?

I can see how some people would believe that. There are writers that have written about their depression or have become victims of suicide. Many of the greats we study today were depressed, or suffered from some mental health issues. But, just as there are writers that suffer from permanent depression there are those that have never and will never suffer from a mental health disorder.

To answer your question, I don’t think it is true because it depends on the writer and every writer is different.

Personally, I’ve struggled with depression and anxiety. The important part was that I recognized the problem and got help. I spoke with people that helped me find ways to cope with my mental health but there are those out there that never seek help or never require the help they need.

Being aware of your mental health and looking for ways of educating yourself or getting help with managing your mental health is important. It saddens me that in a time where we have so much knowledge we have yet to really approach the subjects of mental health.

Sure, there are brief mentions of it when we lose someone famous we admire to suicide. Their loss sparks a short discussion but there is so much we as a society need to do to change the way we think about mental health.

 

Poets and writers in general, have a reputation of committing suicide; in your opinion, why is that the case?

I think poets and writers are empathetic people that are tuned into the world. That could be both a good thing and a bad thing. The good out of being one with the world is that you see the beauty and the potential it holds. You catch the connections between people or the environment and find ways of creating that emotional connection through words. Many writers (Shakespeare, Poe, Wolfe, Bronte) all have a way of putting humanity in their works and painting this world that is so close to our own while still giving us a sense of disconnect. This is a talent some have naturally, while for others – like myself – work at building.

The bad part about being connected to the world is that you see the horrific truths many aren’t aware of. You catch sight of the darkness in people and some writers even confront the darkness within themselves. Everyone has demons that whisper in the back of their minds nasty realizations, but writers tap into those whispers and sometimes don’t have the strength to stop listening. It is at that point that writers can’t see that beauty but instead see the world in a tainted light where only pain and suffering thrive.

I think every writer/person is able to deal with the negatives in different ways. Some are able to find ways back to the rose tinted glasses world that the majority of society lives in, while others aren’t so lucky. It’s those unlucky ones that don’t see hope and don’t have the strength to pull themselves out… who think they’re alone… that add to the reputations that writers/ poets generally commit suicide.

I want to know what you think.

Do you agree with my answers to these questions? Do you disagree? If you disagree, tell me why. I would love to get a discussion started in the comments down below. 🙂

Thinking Thursdays: Teach Social Innovation/ Change

I remember when I first heard the word non-profit.

I was around six years old and we were given a box to wear around our necks at Halloween to collect change while we trick-or-treated. Most people gave us pennies (when pennies were still around), or didn’t give change at all.

The second time I heard about non-profit was when I was eight. We were doing a pop tab drive, collecting the tabs to make wheelchairs for kids that could afford them and bikes for kids in third world countries.

As a kid it felt good to be part of something that was created social change in some way. Those pop tabs I collected or those pennies I was given would lead to helping someone I never knew and would likely never meet. On my own time I looked into what these programs were and what they did. I kept reading the word non-profit on their websites, alongside the list of their values, mission statements, and vision – but never did I learn about what they were from schools.

Later on in high school when we all think we are smarter than our teachers and we start realising the world isn’t this shiny, perfect place like our parents would have a believe my opinion changed about non-profits. For a short time – mostly from wanting to be liked among my peers – my opinion about non-profits were that all they wanted was money. They weren’t really helping people like they said they were. They are frauds. They are money hungry. They don’t do anything.

I now know – at 25 years of age – that my teenage self was stupid.

The world was not just black and white – that indeed there were these grey sections trying to tip the scale to better the lives of those in poverty, abuse, war. That there were people in the world that realised how much it sucked and were trying to make our future and the future for others better than the last.

I don’t blame my younger, ignorant self for think what she thought. There was computers where I could explore my ideas further, or libraries filled with books that could have corrected my opinion. I had teachers that ran clubs in our school focused towards social justice but there was never a class nor a lesson that covered what those words actually meant. At an age between 13-18 you feel like you can’t make a difference but if you were given a chance to help the world – even if it’s collecting pop tabs – they may have a different opinion of the world.

So, this is what I propose.

At the young age of six get your children involved with a world issue – environment, social… etc. – let them learn first hand about how one person can effect the balance.

At an older age teach them about non-profits or other charitable organisations in the world. For Canada, teach the history of social change and innovation by telling the events that took place in the 80s where Canadians came together and saved South Moresby, BC from deforestation. Show them that there can be light in a world so filled with terrible events, fears, and death.

But most of all, teach your kids that there is always hope. That by taking the paths before them that they have choices that could effect the world. That if they knew more about how to change the world, than maybe one day we will live in a better one.

Anyways, that’s all I have to say. Do you agree or disagree with my rant? Let me know in the comments below, and until next time have fun, stay safe, and change the world for the better. 🙂

If you are interested in learning more about non-profit and charity I suggest the best place to start is watching this video from TEDTalk. It has helped me open my mind and question what we’re doing in this world.

 

Thinking Thursdays: What Inspires You?

Hello World Out There World!

Today on Thinking Thursday we are covering the question: What inspires you?

This question I’ve covered a while back but for those of you who are new to this blog I’ll answer this question in this post.

When it comes to being inspired I would have to say a lot of things inspire me. It all depends on my mood, and the environment. Old projects inspire me, things people say inspire me, or certain images inspire me.

As of late I’ve been watching a lot of Netflix and there have been a few shows that have opened my mind to new ideas. Touch, a show about a boy that sees the world in numbers has given me knew ideas on abilities people could have. American Crime, a show about a family dealing with the murder of their son with a major twist has given me ideas on how to approach modern crime short stories.

Today what has inspired me to work/ write is not only obligation (as I need to stick with updating this blog more regularly) but also discovering old projects. I’ve been transferring a lot of old writing pieces over to my new desktop and found some stories that I thought I lost or deleted. I’m happy to say that didn’t happen and more than thrilled to be able to tackle some of these old projects. Not only does it help me remember a time when creative writing was easier for me but also I can improve on the stories that I had written now with a better writing approach.

At the end of the day it really depends on if I’m looking to be creative or not. Most of the time when I’m not looking for a way to become inspired inspiration finds me. I don’t know if this is the same for any of you… I would like to hear from you on what inspires you.

Now, I have to finish up dinner and get back to editing book two. Maybe I’ll even take a break and check out The Sun Child – the short book series I started back in high school. Who knows, I may have more than Prophecy Six to share with the world.

Until next time – Toodles!!

Thinking Thursdays: 1st or 3rd Person?

Hello World Out There World!

Today’s Thinking Thursday is about 1st or 3rd person, which one do I prefer to write in.

When I first started getting into creative writing I found writing in 1st person the easiest way to get out my ideas. I would be able to imagine myself as the main character and write what I felt or saw. This was what was taught to us in school in regards to approaching creative writing. All I knew was 1st person and nothing else.

It was after doing some more research and reading books that weren’t for my age level that I discovered the amazing tense of 3rd person. I loved how the writer could explore a variety of views within one book and make the story deeper, or just write in one person’s point of view for the whole book. It was something new and exciting, which pushed me to practice writing in 3rd person.

As time went on I shied away from 1st person and started writing in 3rd person. Child of the Light (Book 1) is written in 3rd person and so is Children of Sirphan (Book 2). I found 3rd person the best style to use for this series since it follows a large group of people. It has been only recently, as I work on another side project – Too Much Jinn – that I’ve begun exploring 1st person again.

To me I don’t prefer writing in just one style. It depends on the characters and the book I’m working on as to what point of view works for the atmosphere I’m trying to portray.

When it comes to reading books I would much rather read in 3rd person than first. I like to be disconnected from the characters that I’m reading about and that is easier to do with 3rd person than 1st person. I also find a lot of young books are 1st person focused, which I don’t enjoy reading either. 1st person has a lot of I did this, I wanted to do that. With 3rd person the author is forced to explore the world more to capture the reader than just write from one view point.

Anyways… that’s just what I prefer…

What about you? Is there a point of view that you prefer to write in or does it just depend on the story you’re writing?

Leave your answers in the comment section down below and until next time – toodles!! :3

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