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Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

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wonderful words

Old Word Friday: Senticous

Hello World Out There World!

All right, so this week is on OWF we aren’t going to be focusing on a forgotten word. This week I thought I would share with you a old word from my favourites list that I’ve used in regular conversation, and in turn have heard this word spoken by others familiar with it. So, with that said this week’s word is senticous, which is an adjective (a describing word) that was created around the 1650’s. The word senticous means ‘prickly or thorny’.

How do you pronounce senticous?

SENT – EI – CUS

Examples of using senticous in a sentence:

There is an senticous rose bush behind my house.

Or…

The old man across the street is known to be senticous.

Or…

I went to the grocery store and decided I wanted to buy a senticous pear.

Should we use this word more frequently?

Yes, I love this word. How it sounds and what it means come together in perfect unity. I have used this word while I’m gardening, or when I wish to insult someone for having a senticous personality. It is a fancy words… but for whatever reason it makes me feel good whenever I speak it. I want it to be used more frequently just so more people will know what I’m saying. ^.^

Old Word Friday: Quibble & Quibbleism

Hello World Out There World!

This week’s old word forgotten by history is quibbleism. Now, before I explain to you what this word is I’ll have to explain to you what quibble is. Quibble is the act of arguing or raising objections to something. It is a verb and you would have likely hear this word in literature during 1830-1900. Quibbleism is a noun that means ‘the practice of quibbling’. This word was used during 1836 and died off around the beginnings of the 1900s.

How are these words pronounced:

KWI – BELL

KWI-BELL-IS-MM

Examples of these words in a sentence:

The old man liked to quibble with his neighbours.

Or…

There is always a lot of quibbling going on at the courthouse.

Or…

The young lawyer’s quibbleism earned his client a retrial.

Should this word make a comeback?

Asides from it being a fun word to say I don’t think it would make a return to the common language use of today. If someone is writing a book based around 1800-1900 then it would make sense to use this word. A writer may even find the word useful if they are trying to portray a Sherlock Holmes type character. In the end, I do not see this word returning but that isn’t going to stop me from using it. 🙂

WOTD: Crowded

Today’s Word of the Day is CROWDED.

Crowded is an adjective which means ‘a space or area full of people, leaving little or no room for movement; packed close’.

Examples of how this word is used will be found throughout the story below:

The reason I chose to start with this word was because today I took a trip to a place many of you may be familiar with – Costco.

To start this off – I love Costco. There are many benefits to having a membership and also love what the stores in my area offer. I am not complaining about the company. I am complaining about the crowds of people that think they are the only ones worthy to be in the store and forget that respect and personal space exist. (Any of you have this problem when at a wholesale store or just me?)

Now, I’ve been to wholesales stores in the past. When I lived in Thunder Bay we would travel over the border to buy our stuff in Duluth and visit the Sam’s Club while we were there. We would fill our house with toilet paper, paper towels, value packs of chicken stuffing, Old El Paso taco kits, and much much more.

Since moving to Southern Ontario we didn’t think we would need to indulge in wholesale deals. We were doing fine going to the local grocers or the farmers market… but low and behold we got ourselves a membership. Specially, Mr. Canuck got us a membership. 🙂

I think we got the membership because people at Mr. Canuck’s work always spoke of the deals they got from Costco on the weekend, or we would hear about it at my father’s place when we would go over for dinner. I understood the desire to get a deal… deal hunting and discount lovers are scattered throughout my family tree. So, honestly, I’m surprised it took 8 months to get a membership.

Anyways, we decided to check out the Costco near by to see what offers they had and instantly remembered why we didn’t go to wholesale stores all the time.

You remember the deals… you don’t remember the crowds.

It was packed tight. Crowded – some would say – like discounted canned sardines (aisle 12).

The parking lot was a nightmare with people waddling down the middle of the road in front of your car or people standing in the middle of the road carrying on conversations. There were shopping carts taking up parking spaces and other people who parked their car in two spaces because one just wasn’t enough. When inside people were zipping around with carts, running people over without a care. Babies were screaming, old people were causing traffic jams in the aisles, and even two women started fighting over a discount pumpkin pie. Okay… maybe not fighting… more like a strongly worded debate over pumpkin pie. It was madness I tell you… a scene out of Mad Max but instead of cars they were shopping carts.

Silly us, we didn’t grab a cart so we were dodging people with our arms full of the items were wanted to buy. My insides were in a ball, my pulse was racing, and I was starting to get disoriented because no matter which way I turned there was no way out between the towering shelves of wholesale goods and the walls of bumper-car-shopping-carts.

After twenty minutes Mr. Canuck and I escaped with a large Caesar salad, two bags of bagels, a bag of crispy onions, and thankfully our lives.

I liked the discounts. I loved the deals and the amount you get… but I hated the crowds of people that made it difficult to be the nice, friendly Canadians our nation is known for. Next time I will have to know what I’m going into that store for and go alone so I don’t keep worrying about misplacing my partner somewhere in the store.

Old Word Friday: Deartuate

Hello world out there world!!

Many of you know my favourite word is bludgeon. It is such a fantastic word and comes across well as a violent word when it needs to be. I love the sound of it and the history behind it… well today’s word is something similar.

Deartuate is a verb that was created during the years 1623-1653. It was commonly used during this time. To deartuate someone is to dismember them. Again a violent word but I just find this bloody fantastic. (Pun not intended).

So how do you use deartuate in a sentence:

The murderer deartuated the body so no one could identify it with ease.

Or…

To deartuate or to not deartuate – that is the question.

This is a word that can be easier to use in a sentence than last weeks OWF. I can definitely see myself using this word in my future books, since the more the book series goes on the likelihood I will need creative terms asides from bludgeon to use in certain scenes. This is a word I want to make a comeback. Not because I like it… well that is one reason… but because it is a word that sounds as violent as what it means.

Until next week – toodles everyone!

 

 

Wonderful Word Wednesday: Whimsical

WHIMSICAL.jpg

I’ve been looking at a lot of classic children’s books recently and one word that continues popping up is whimsical. I love this word because it sounds like a word the suits its definition.

Whimsical basically fanciful or playfully charming in an amusing way. You see the word used in regards to fairytale creatures like imps, elves, or fairies. Magical princess’s may have a whimsical charm too depending on the story.

I enjoy using this word when creating children stories because it is a fun sounding word that is easy to pronounce/ sound out.

Sentences using whimsical:

Mr. Matthew’s wife was a whimsical woman.

or…

The blue fairy danced whimsically around the tree.

Wonderful Word Wednesday: Chockablock

Yes, as weird as this word looks it is a word. Although it appears to be a compound word I assure you it is not… it is a word that stands alone and is actually a fun word to use.

Chockablock’s first unknown use was during 1850 as a nautical term/ rhyming phrase meaning the two blocks and tactical found on the vessels seaman were work on. [Definition Found HERE]

Now-a-days the word has taken a completely different turn. Chockablock means full, jammed, or overly crowded. This is also believed to be the word that led to the formation of the word chockful (like chockful of information).

Here are some ways of using the word:

I am chockablock of information on weird words.

Or…

This room is chockablock of people.

 

 

Wonderful Word Wednesday: Collywobbles

Today I have collywobbles. I must have eaten something or not eaten enough of something today to cause this stomach problem. All day my stomach has been doing flip flops – it sucks. 😦

Anyways, that’s not stopping me from posting WWW and if you haven’t guessed it – the word is collywobbles. But what does it mean?

Pretty much what I put in the first part – a collywobble is when you feel pain in the abdomen and especially in the stomach; a bellyache. People believe that this word came from the Latin word pertaining to cholera (cholera morbus). Although it may have been used as a serious medical term back in the day, it now has changed to signify much lesser/ sever gastrol issue(s). Not to mention it is a super fun word to say over and over again. 🙂

Ways to use collywobble in a sentence:

The class came down with collywobbles after eating Ms. Burtworth’s cookies.

Or…

I called in sick to work because of collywobbles.

Wonderful Word Wednesday: Snuggery

Right now I’m sitting in what I’d call the snuggery of my apartment. The word snuggery pertains to a cozy little room or place in a house.

In 16 days I will be leaving my current snuggery in search of a newer snuggery closer to my family. It will be nice to be closer than 18 hours from where I grew up. I’ll get to see people I haven’t seen for six years.

Anyways… I honestly don’t think I need to give you examples of how to use snuggery in a sentence since I used them throughout this post. XD

Old Word Friday: Elflock

 

This word is a magical sounding word for something as simple as tangled hair. That is literally what an elflock is… it is a description word for tangled hair. Imagine little elves tangling your hair when you sleep… hence the origin of the word.

Sentences using elflock:

The wind wrapped elflocks blew across her face.

Or…

I woke up this morning with so many elflocks I broke my comb.

 

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