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Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

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word definition

Old Word Friday: NOSCIBLE

Today’s Old Word Friday is noscible.

Noscible is an adjective that was used mostly around 1654. The word isn’t as noscible as it was back then and so that’s why it finds itself on this list of forgettable old words.

If you haven’t guess the meaning of the word from the last sentence noscible pretty much means ‘knowable or something well-known’. Now that previous sentence probably makes a lot more sense.

How to pronounce the word:

NO – SIB – LE

Should this word come back?

I think so. It is a good word and I love how it sounds in sentences. Noscible, when used correctly, sounds like the word you are wanting to use. It also has a similar sound to noticeable… which is possibly why this word would work in modern conversation. I know I’ll be trying to use it in my regular conversations from now on… but I think by now people expect me to have a old style vocabulary. XD

Old Word Friday: MISQUEME

Hello World Out There World!

This week on OWF we are tackling a verb that was created around 1395 and lasted until 1658. This word lasted longer than the others I’ve shared with you all on my other posts and that might be because of what this word means.

Misqueme means to displease or to offend someone. This is a great word to use as there is an election coming up and this word will be a great replacement for the other rhetoric that has blown up on all the social media sites.

This weeks word is pronounced:

MIS – QUE – ME

Some examples of using this word in sentences are:

When Trump opens his mouth it is only a matter of time before he misquemes someone.

Or…

Hillary’s email scandal misquemed a lot of her supporters.

Or…

A lot of us are misqueme they don’t have another candidate to vote for.

Conclusion:

Do I want this word to come back? Sure, I can see it being a useful word. I also think it would add a new word to the rhetoric that we are hearing around the US election. I also like how it sounds when you say it, it is a very catchy word.

Old Word Friday: Fallaciloquence & Gardeviance

Hello world out there world!

Welcome back to Old World Friday! This week I have two words to share with you… and both happen to be quite the mouthful.

So, let’s get started.

This first word we are going to work with is fallaciloquence.

Pronounced: fall-a-cil-o-quence

You probably can figure out why that word has disappeared as it isn’t the easiest one to pronounce or the easiest one to fit into sentences but HEY! We can try, right?

Fallaciloquence is a noun that was believed to have been created around 1656 and was used commonly up to around 1761. The word means deceitful or false speech – which is short to write or say that than to put fallaciloquence… but that’s besirdes the point.

It is one of those fancy words that may help you sound smarter… or possibly make a character you wish to be smart sound snobbish or disconnected to common word uses.

Two sentences I came up with to use this word are:

Despite his popularity the presidential candidate was known for his fallaciloquence.

Or…

No one should trust a person with fallociloquence.

The second word I will be sharing with you today isn’t are hard to use in a sentence as fallaciloquence. This word is also a noun thought of have been created around 1459 and lessened in popularity around 1706. The word is gardeviance.

Pronounced: gar – deviance

What is a gardeviance? It is a fancier name for a chest you keep valuables in or clothing in. It is also another word for travelling trunk.

Some suggestions on where to use this word in your writing would be in a fantasy story with a foot in medieval history. Or a historical fiction of some sort based in the time when that word was more commonly used. If you have a time travelling character or an immortal character they could use that word as well.

Two examples of using this word in a sentence are:

Mother kept all my baby clothes in the oak gardeviance in our living room.

Or…

I love going to antique stores and seeing the large assortment of gardeviances.

Out of these two words I would find myself using gardeviance more than fallaciloquence as most of what I write is YA fantasy with medieval details. That doesn’t mean I won’t use both words eventually, I just find that gardeviance is an easier word to use than the mouthful that was the first word we covered.

Do I hope for these words to make a comeback?

No, unlike other words I’ve approached in the past these words would not suit modern day conversation unless you wish to set a bad precedence with being known as a snob. The words would work in conversation with other word lovers but not with strangers at a bus stop.

And until next time – toodles!!

Old Word Friday: Acrasial

 

That’s right!

After a long break OWF (Old Word Friday) has returned. I needed to build back up my old work list and do some research so I could share them with the world. I’m so happy to be getting back to the roots of this blog since OWF is one of the original posts I did on a weekly bases since this place started.

So, without further ado I give you this week’s old word: ACRASIAL

Acrasial is an adjective believed to have been created in 1851. It was believed to be first used by the American novelist Sylvester Judd who lived from 1813-1853 in Westhampton, Massachusetts.

The word means ill-regulated or ill-tempered.

For example:

Robert Baratheon was an acrasial king.

Or…

The acrasial teacher was known to throw desks at his students.

The use of acrasial can be found in a lot of older books but is a term rarely used in modern works. I love this word because I love interesting adjectives that are forgotten by time.

Question of the day:

Have you heard or read the word acrasial before? If so where?

 

Writer Tales: Always Do Your Research (Quote)

Firstly, I love writing quotes. I’ll be the first person to tell you that I get a lot of inspiration from quotes when I’m suffering from writers block or just need a little push. Many of these quotes I’ve shared with you in hopes of helping you feel the same inspiration or motivation to work on your own projects. The thing is, with most of what I put on my blog or website I make sure to research to ensure I am sharing correct information. This is a habit I’ve formed from my teaching days and I’ve only gotten better/ worse (depending on your point of view) since I’ve been researching for my book series.

Today when I was browsing Pinterest one of my suggested pins was a quote with the word HYPERGRAPHIA. I was familiar with this word, since it was in one of my lists somewhere on my computer. So, it was a surprise for me to find that the definition for the word was cut short. Now, this was the pin I had on my front page:

hypergraphia

Beautiful, right? The word that describes the overwhelming urge to write. We’ve all felt this way about writing at least once (or maybe more than once), but there is a problem with this: there is so much more to this word than those pretty four words.

Hypergraphia is an actual symptom for a brain disorder. People suffering from hypergraphia have the urge to write sometime incoherently due to them having epilepsy that causes changes in the temporal lobe. Sometimes those with this symptom will write in amazing detail, beautiful poetry, or utter nonsense. Their styles can change without warning and they won’t stop until the symptom passes or seizure ends.  It isn’t that they want to write but that something in their brain is telling them they have/need to write – even if part of them doesn’t wish to.

I understand that having that as the definition doesn’t get you reposts and people are less likely to like it… the word also doesn’t have that sense of motivation or inspiration as it had moments before but the truth sometimes is better than spreading false or – in this case – limited information. That’s why I edited this quote to add a little more truth to it:

NEWDEFINITIONS

I’m not looking for reposts or repins… I just want to make sure the truth is out there.

I know I’m strange, that hasn’t escaped me. I still find this word fascinating even with this edited definition. I think that has more to due with my passion for psychology and English. The point to this post isn’t that someone decided to post a half-correct definition of a word, but to help you understand that it is up to you to question what you find online to see if it is actually true.

Do your research – it will save you a lot of embarrassment in the end.

 

Wonderful Word Wednesday: Whimsical

WHIMSICAL.jpg

I’ve been looking at a lot of classic children’s books recently and one word that continues popping up is whimsical. I love this word because it sounds like a word the suits its definition.

Whimsical basically fanciful or playfully charming in an amusing way. You see the word used in regards to fairytale creatures like imps, elves, or fairies. Magical princess’s may have a whimsical charm too depending on the story.

I enjoy using this word when creating children stories because it is a fun sounding word that is easy to pronounce/ sound out.

Sentences using whimsical:

Mr. Matthew’s wife was a whimsical woman.

or…

The blue fairy danced whimsically around the tree.

Old Word Friday: Groke & Grok

The old word for this Friday is groke. I was inspired to choose this word when I travelled to a cat cafe the other day. When I was drinking my Purrr-fect Smoothie one of the cats, a little black cat with white on its chest named Barbi, sat at my feet looking up at me with its big yellow eyes groking.

Groke is a Old Scottish word that describes someone or something staring at you while you eat in hopes that you give them some food. Dogs are very good at groking but this was my first time seeing a cat groke.

Now, this word is not to be confused with the word grok – created/ coined by the Sci-fi writer Robert Heinlein. To grok is to understand something or someone through empathy or to show empathy to establish a relationship. You can probably see how these two words can be confused… and often are when you want to use the word groke instead of grok. Thanks Auto Correct. 🙂

English is weird…

Wonderful Word Wednesday: Zenzizenzizenzic

Sorry for the delay in posting. I was travelling across Ontario to my new home and it took a little longer to hook up a proper internet connection to post on here. Posts should resume to a normal schedule from this post onward.

Now, for today’s WWW I give you the word zenzizenzizenzic. No I did not make up this word. No, I do not expect you to ever need to know/use this word in your lifetime. I honestly have this part of my Weird Word List which I rarely use in day-to-day writing. I just found this word fasinating in the sense it is a proper word used in mathematics.

Zenzizenzizenzic is a word for the obsolete form of mathematical notation representing the eighth power of a number (thank you Google for that definition).

I – in no way – will be using this in a sentence since it is likely to only be used to describe mathematical equations or other number sentences. You can just revival in the fact you know a word like zenzizenzizenzic and can brag to others that you now know this ridiculous word. 🙂

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