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Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

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Old Word Friday: Words Found in Children of Sirphan

Hello World!

So this Old Word Friday is going to focus on the old words I mixed into my new book Children of Sirphan, which is going to be released in 4 days (December 20th). I thought it would be appropriate to bring back some old words that I shared back at the beginning of the Old Word Friday series and they just so happen to be in use throughout my most recent book. So, without any further delay here we go!

Mullock

This word is a noun which means rubbish or nonsense. The word mullock is still popular in places like Australia and many of you would likely have heard the word mullarkey or malarkey – which is the modernized and more popular term deriving from mullock.

How do you pronounce mullock?

MUL – LUCK

How to use this word in a sentence:

“Well… you have done some unexplainable things that were explained by that mullock…” Caldor huffed.

Or…

He only hoped his colleagues wouldn’t denounce him for believing such mullock.

Should mullock make a comeback?

In a sense it already has with the term mullarkey or malarkey being so popular in other parts of the world. Mullock, though, is a word I use on a regular bases and have used in my books. I would like to see more people welcoming the word into their vocabulary but I do not know if that is going to happen anytime soon.

 

Twirlblast

Twirlblast is a noun which is another name given to a tornado or wind funnel. I chose to share this word originally because I like how it sounded and thought it funny that tornado had replaced such a silly sounding word.

How do you pronounce twirlblast?

TWIRL – BLAST

How is twirlblast used in a sentence?

“It looks like a twirlblast came through here,” Liora sighed as the old sage spun around to face her.

Or…

“Hey yoou…” Cáel strained to use the common word, while keeping a calm tone of voice. He avoided stepping on the books that lined the floor like pop pots. He didn’t need her turning her anger towards him. “Looks like a twirlblast came tearin’ through here, eh?”

Should twirlblast make a comeback?

I think it would be a fun word to know but wouldn’t be a popular word to use. I only say that because the word twirlblast sounds like your downplaying the dangers of what a tornado can do. A twirlblast sounds like a blast of hot air in the summer not a spinning funnel of destruction.

 

Nibling

An oldie but still one of my favourites. Nibling means niece or nephew. They are your siblings offspring, therefore making them your niblings. I like this word because it combines two words (niece and nephew) in to one gender neutral word (nibling). It is also very fun to say.

How do you pronounce nibling?

NIB – LING

How do you use nibling in a sentence?

“No, Li, I need yah here to help Marcia,” Foe smiled, “her family will be visitin’ and yah’ll get to meet me niblings, who I’m sure yah’ll love.”

Or…

Revris is Rebin’s nibling.

Should nibling make a comeback?

Why not? It is a fun word. It simplifies things… and there was already a movement at a school in the UK that wanted to bring nibling back. If the children are wanting to use the word I don’t see why we shouldn’t bring this word back into the normal rotation of verbal conversation.

 

So there are just the three most used OLD WORDS I used in my most recent book – Children of Sirphan! Keep your eyes open closer to December 20th to find out where you can get your copy of this wildly popular young adult fantasy. Until next time be creative, stay safe, and as always Toodles! ^.^

 

Old Word Friday: Resarciate

Hello World Out There World!

This week on OWF I bring you resarciate. This word was created around the 1656 and reached pique popularity one year later in 1657. I’m sure this word is used today, not saying that any of the words I have posted thus far aren’t in use, but it isn’t commonly used or used in popularity. Hence it being on the OWF posts.

Now, that that is out of my system let’s learn a little more about the word resarciate. The word is a verb (action, state, or occurrence) and means ‘to mend or to make amends’.

How do you pronounce resarciate?

RE-SAR-SEE-ATE

Examples of this word in a sentence:

I want to resarciate my problems before they get too far out of hand.

Or…

My sister wants to resarciate her relationship before it’s too late.

Or…

My mother told me it was better to resarciate then let things fester.

Should this word make a come back?

When it comes to the word resarciate I could see it being used in a more educational setting, like in schools – specifically a private school setting. I could also see this word being popular in more European countries but not in North America. The word sounds like something those in a higher institution would be using to discuss politics. I do like the word and will likely use it in my future books but in everyday conversation with a stranger on the street I’ll continue to use the words that make up its definition.

Old Word Friday: Privign

Hello World Out There World!

This weeks old word is privign. Now, this word is a noun that was used mostly between 1605 all the way to 1654. Privign is a fancier way of saying stepson… why they had to make a fancier term for stepson I don’t know but that’s what this weeks word means.

How to pronounce this weeks word:

PRI-VINE

Examples of using privign in a sentence:

He was looking forward to gaining a privign after he married the love of his life.

Or…

The woman was known to not be so kind to her privign.

Or…

Their privign was treated more like a housekeeper than one of their children.

Should this would be brought back?

I think if you are writing historical fiction or getting together with your steampunk buddies for an adventure around town this word would make more sense to use… but to use it in common, everyday conversation – no. Like many of the words I do in this segment privign is a fun word to say but it’s one that would take more explaining than it would to just say stepson. This doesn’t mean I won’t use it but I doubt it is going to make a comeback. 🙂

WOTD: Crowded

Today’s Word of the Day is CROWDED.

Crowded is an adjective which means ‘a space or area full of people, leaving little or no room for movement; packed close’.

Examples of how this word is used will be found throughout the story below:

The reason I chose to start with this word was because today I took a trip to a place many of you may be familiar with – Costco.

To start this off – I love Costco. There are many benefits to having a membership and also love what the stores in my area offer. I am not complaining about the company. I am complaining about the crowds of people that think they are the only ones worthy to be in the store and forget that respect and personal space exist. (Any of you have this problem when at a wholesale store or just me?)

Now, I’ve been to wholesales stores in the past. When I lived in Thunder Bay we would travel over the border to buy our stuff in Duluth and visit the Sam’s Club while we were there. We would fill our house with toilet paper, paper towels, value packs of chicken stuffing, Old El Paso taco kits, and much much more.

Since moving to Southern Ontario we didn’t think we would need to indulge in wholesale deals. We were doing fine going to the local grocers or the farmers market… but low and behold we got ourselves a membership. Specially, Mr. Canuck got us a membership. 🙂

I think we got the membership because people at Mr. Canuck’s work always spoke of the deals they got from Costco on the weekend, or we would hear about it at my father’s place when we would go over for dinner. I understood the desire to get a deal… deal hunting and discount lovers are scattered throughout my family tree. So, honestly, I’m surprised it took 8 months to get a membership.

Anyways, we decided to check out the Costco near by to see what offers they had and instantly remembered why we didn’t go to wholesale stores all the time.

You remember the deals… you don’t remember the crowds.

It was packed tight. Crowded – some would say – like discounted canned sardines (aisle 12).

The parking lot was a nightmare with people waddling down the middle of the road in front of your car or people standing in the middle of the road carrying on conversations. There were shopping carts taking up parking spaces and other people who parked their car in two spaces because one just wasn’t enough. When inside people were zipping around with carts, running people over without a care. Babies were screaming, old people were causing traffic jams in the aisles, and even two women started fighting over a discount pumpkin pie. Okay… maybe not fighting… more like a strongly worded debate over pumpkin pie. It was madness I tell you… a scene out of Mad Max but instead of cars they were shopping carts.

Silly us, we didn’t grab a cart so we were dodging people with our arms full of the items were wanted to buy. My insides were in a ball, my pulse was racing, and I was starting to get disoriented because no matter which way I turned there was no way out between the towering shelves of wholesale goods and the walls of bumper-car-shopping-carts.

After twenty minutes Mr. Canuck and I escaped with a large Caesar salad, two bags of bagels, a bag of crispy onions, and thankfully our lives.

I liked the discounts. I loved the deals and the amount you get… but I hated the crowds of people that made it difficult to be the nice, friendly Canadians our nation is known for. Next time I will have to know what I’m going into that store for and go alone so I don’t keep worrying about misplacing my partner somewhere in the store.

Old Word Friday: ICASM

Hello World Out There World!

Since the last couple of OWF’s have been a mouthful to say I thought this week I would bring to your attention a short, simple word that happens to be one of my favourites. Today’s OWF happens to be a short word that was created around 1664. The word icasm is a noun, (a person, place, or thing). The definition of this word is: a figurative expression in speech.

How do you pronounce this word?

I – CAS – M

Some examples of using icasm in a sentence are:

The girl protested that the threats she made to the boy were only an icasm.

Or…

My teacher has a bad habit for using icasms.

Should icasm make a come-back to our common speech?

I know I’ll be using it when I speak. It sounds like a funny little word and with my habit of using icasms when I take it may come in handy. I don’t think it will return to everyday language but maybe to certain word enthusiasts.

 

Old Word Friday: Cacozealous

This weeks OWF is cacozealous. This adjective was created and mostly used between 1656-1696. The word means to imitate badly or something that is poorly affected.

Examples of this word in a sentence are:

The student’s cacozealous attempt of impersonating their teacher was in terrible taste.

Or…

They were cacozealous by the bad weather.

….

I understand how this word could have faded away over the years. It is awkward to use in sentences and has a hard time working in conjunction with other words. I would suggest using this word in a minimal way, or to spice up a sentence instead of using imitated badly or poorly affected. This is one word though, I would like not want to see make a come back.

 

Old Word Friday: Acrasial

 

That’s right!

After a long break OWF (Old Word Friday) has returned. I needed to build back up my old work list and do some research so I could share them with the world. I’m so happy to be getting back to the roots of this blog since OWF is one of the original posts I did on a weekly bases since this place started.

So, without further ado I give you this week’s old word: ACRASIAL

Acrasial is an adjective believed to have been created in 1851. It was believed to be first used by the American novelist Sylvester Judd who lived from 1813-1853 in Westhampton, Massachusetts.

The word means ill-regulated or ill-tempered.

For example:

Robert Baratheon was an acrasial king.

Or…

The acrasial teacher was known to throw desks at his students.

The use of acrasial can be found in a lot of older books but is a term rarely used in modern works. I love this word because I love interesting adjectives that are forgotten by time.

Question of the day:

Have you heard or read the word acrasial before? If so where?

 

Writer Tales: Always Do Your Research (Quote)

Firstly, I love writing quotes. I’ll be the first person to tell you that I get a lot of inspiration from quotes when I’m suffering from writers block or just need a little push. Many of these quotes I’ve shared with you in hopes of helping you feel the same inspiration or motivation to work on your own projects. The thing is, with most of what I put on my blog or website I make sure to research to ensure I am sharing correct information. This is a habit I’ve formed from my teaching days and I’ve only gotten better/ worse (depending on your point of view) since I’ve been researching for my book series.

Today when I was browsing Pinterest one of my suggested pins was a quote with the word HYPERGRAPHIA. I was familiar with this word, since it was in one of my lists somewhere on my computer. So, it was a surprise for me to find that the definition for the word was cut short. Now, this was the pin I had on my front page:

hypergraphia

Beautiful, right? The word that describes the overwhelming urge to write. We’ve all felt this way about writing at least once (or maybe more than once), but there is a problem with this: there is so much more to this word than those pretty four words.

Hypergraphia is an actual symptom for a brain disorder. People suffering from hypergraphia have the urge to write sometime incoherently due to them having epilepsy that causes changes in the temporal lobe. Sometimes those with this symptom will write in amazing detail, beautiful poetry, or utter nonsense. Their styles can change without warning and they won’t stop until the symptom passes or seizure ends.  It isn’t that they want to write but that something in their brain is telling them they have/need to write – even if part of them doesn’t wish to.

I understand that having that as the definition doesn’t get you reposts and people are less likely to like it… the word also doesn’t have that sense of motivation or inspiration as it had moments before but the truth sometimes is better than spreading false or – in this case – limited information. That’s why I edited this quote to add a little more truth to it:

NEWDEFINITIONS

I’m not looking for reposts or repins… I just want to make sure the truth is out there.

I know I’m strange, that hasn’t escaped me. I still find this word fascinating even with this edited definition. I think that has more to due with my passion for psychology and English. The point to this post isn’t that someone decided to post a half-correct definition of a word, but to help you understand that it is up to you to question what you find online to see if it is actually true.

Do your research – it will save you a lot of embarrassment in the end.

 

Wonderful Word Wednesday: Whimsical

WHIMSICAL.jpg

I’ve been looking at a lot of classic children’s books recently and one word that continues popping up is whimsical. I love this word because it sounds like a word the suits its definition.

Whimsical basically fanciful or playfully charming in an amusing way. You see the word used in regards to fairytale creatures like imps, elves, or fairies. Magical princess’s may have a whimsical charm too depending on the story.

I enjoy using this word when creating children stories because it is a fun sounding word that is easy to pronounce/ sound out.

Sentences using whimsical:

Mr. Matthew’s wife was a whimsical woman.

or…

The blue fairy danced whimsically around the tree.

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