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Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

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Old Word Friday: Resarciate

Hello World Out There World!

This week on OWF I bring you resarciate. This word was created around the 1656 and reached pique popularity one year later in 1657. I’m sure this word is used today, not saying that any of the words I have posted thus far aren’t in use, but it isn’t commonly used or used in popularity. Hence it being on the OWF posts.

Now, that that is out of my system let’s learn a little more about the word resarciate. The word is a verb (action, state, or occurrence) and means ‘to mend or to make amends’.

How do you pronounce resarciate?

RE-SAR-SEE-ATE

Examples of this word in a sentence:

I want to resarciate my problems before they get too far out of hand.

Or…

My sister wants to resarciate her relationship before it’s too late.

Or…

My mother told me it was better to resarciate then let things fester.

Should this word make a come back?

When it comes to the word resarciate I could see it being used in a more educational setting, like in schools – specifically a private school setting. I could also see this word being popular in more European countries but not in North America. The word sounds like something those in a higher institution would be using to discuss politics. I do like the word and will likely use it in my future books but in everyday conversation with a stranger on the street I’ll continue to use the words that make up its definition.

Old Word Friday: Labascate

Hello World Out There World!

Old Word Friday is brought to you by LABASCATE. Don’t just fall like any regular pleb – labascate instead. 🙂

Pronouncing this weeks word:

LAB – A – SKATE

 

All right, so this weeks word is a verb and was believed to be used mostly around 1727. It didn’t gain in any popularity and quickly became unpopular around the same time.

Here are some ways to use this word in a sentence:

The dog labascated down the stairs.

Or…

In the winter we love to labascate down the hill in the backyard.

Or…

I’m afraid the car will labascate in these road conditions.

The word labascate means to “start falling or sliding”. I honestly think it would be easier to say fall or slide instead of an elaborate word like labascate but some people like to use fancy words like that. This word would work best with a intellectual character like Sherlock Holmes or for a time period set between the end of the Renaissance to the middle of the Victorian era. Really it is up to you if you want to use this word or not, but it does sound sophisticated.

 

Old Word Friday: Acrasial

 

That’s right!

After a long break OWF (Old Word Friday) has returned. I needed to build back up my old work list and do some research so I could share them with the world. I’m so happy to be getting back to the roots of this blog since OWF is one of the original posts I did on a weekly bases since this place started.

So, without further ado I give you this week’s old word: ACRASIAL

Acrasial is an adjective believed to have been created in 1851. It was believed to be first used by the American novelist Sylvester Judd who lived from 1813-1853 in Westhampton, Massachusetts.

The word means ill-regulated or ill-tempered.

For example:

Robert Baratheon was an acrasial king.

Or…

The acrasial teacher was known to throw desks at his students.

The use of acrasial can be found in a lot of older books but is a term rarely used in modern works. I love this word because I love interesting adjectives that are forgotten by time.

Question of the day:

Have you heard or read the word acrasial before? If so where?

 

Suffering From Millennial Mouth

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When it comes to writing something out I come across as being much older than I actually am. I take my time to think of what I’m going to write and how I want people to portray what I’m going to say. My style, my voice in writing in very different from the actual words that come out of my mouth.

When I type out a story or a blog post my brain forces the words I’m typing through a filter, allowing time to pass between what I’m thinking and what is typed at a fair pace that allows for a smooth transition of fingers to words to happen. I work hard to get what I want to say across to my readers and I absolutely love conversing with a variety of people I would have never met otherwise.

Now, as much as I sound well educated on my blog and present myself in a mature manner through my various social media accounts – in person I sound nothing like how I type.

I like to call this part of me the ‘Millennial Mouth’. When I write in proper sentences on here, using proper words, and most times proper grammar – I speak like I have never heard words before.

When I’m with an older crowd of people my brain forces the filter in front of my mouth and I can communicate properly. That’s the same with work… I’m a great communicator when it is needed of me.

tumblr_inline_nliyk9icz61qjcstiBut if I’m standing at a bus stop or hanging out with my friends at the mall, my words become atrocious. I sound like Google translate gone wrong, yet it amazes me when those of my age group understand me. I can cut out words from a sentence, or create compound words that aren’t really compound words and those around me understand. I can speak in sounds and use like a lot, which in turn has those I’m with communicate the same way and I understand them.

We are modern-day Neanderthals with cellphones, speaking a language that would make those older cringe… but somehow I am still understood.

It baffles me sometimes but at the same time I understand how it happens. Language is an ever changing fluid thing. New words are added to the dictionary every year. When I was a kid saying ‘cool beans’ was the thing and now its ‘on fleek’. When my grandparents were my age their words were ‘bee’s knees’ and ‘cat’s meow’. Every generation adds to our language… and as much as I feel that what I’m speaking is butchering the English language it is actually moulding it for the times.

We don’t speak or write the same way as Shakespeare. Actually, Shakespeare was a creator of many of the words were still use today. Not many of that time actually spoke the way Shakespeare wrote and with the language growing if was language innovators like Shakespeare that gave us the platform to build from today. jhw8hgc

So, yes, I speak terribly most of the time but the words I speak reflect the generation I’m part of. I don’t mind that, since one day the words I’m speaking with be replaced by so many other words. My language will be outdated and I’m fine with that. At least the language I’m typing is more of the mature universal tone that will live throughout the ages. 🙂

Little Robin

robin

Little robin in my tree

Tilting its head and watching me.

Its body bouncing on the limb

Sun’s a setting and daylight dims.

Little robin fly home and rest

Cuddle up warm in your nest.

Tomorrow will bring a brand new day

And your branch will be here for you to stay.

________________________________________________________________

Saw a little robin sitting outside my window in the tree next to my apartment. It was watching me type away on the windowsill. Every time I looked at him he would tilt his head. This poem – although not one of my best – came to my mind and I wanted to share it. The picture isn’t mine. I wanted to take a picture of him but all I had was my cellphone and the resolution of the pictures were carp. Yes, I typed carp on purpose so don’t correct me. I’m trying to lessen my swearing in my life so that translates to more creative swearing in my blog.

Anywho, that is all for now. 🙂

Writer Tales: Always Do Your Research (Quote)

Firstly, I love writing quotes. I’ll be the first person to tell you that I get a lot of inspiration from quotes when I’m suffering from writers block or just need a little push. Many of these quotes I’ve shared with you in hopes of helping you feel the same inspiration or motivation to work on your own projects. The thing is, with most of what I put on my blog or website I make sure to research to ensure I am sharing correct information. This is a habit I’ve formed from my teaching days and I’ve only gotten better/ worse (depending on your point of view) since I’ve been researching for my book series.

Today when I was browsing Pinterest one of my suggested pins was a quote with the word HYPERGRAPHIA. I was familiar with this word, since it was in one of my lists somewhere on my computer. So, it was a surprise for me to find that the definition for the word was cut short. Now, this was the pin I had on my front page:

hypergraphia

Beautiful, right? The word that describes the overwhelming urge to write. We’ve all felt this way about writing at least once (or maybe more than once), but there is a problem with this: there is so much more to this word than those pretty four words.

Hypergraphia is an actual symptom for a brain disorder. People suffering from hypergraphia have the urge to write sometime incoherently due to them having epilepsy that causes changes in the temporal lobe. Sometimes those with this symptom will write in amazing detail, beautiful poetry, or utter nonsense. Their styles can change without warning and they won’t stop until the symptom passes or seizure ends.  It isn’t that they want to write but that something in their brain is telling them they have/need to write – even if part of them doesn’t wish to.

I understand that having that as the definition doesn’t get you reposts and people are less likely to like it… the word also doesn’t have that sense of motivation or inspiration as it had moments before but the truth sometimes is better than spreading false or – in this case – limited information. That’s why I edited this quote to add a little more truth to it:

NEWDEFINITIONS

I’m not looking for reposts or repins… I just want to make sure the truth is out there.

I know I’m strange, that hasn’t escaped me. I still find this word fascinating even with this edited definition. I think that has more to due with my passion for psychology and English. The point to this post isn’t that someone decided to post a half-correct definition of a word, but to help you understand that it is up to you to question what you find online to see if it is actually true.

Do your research – it will save you a lot of embarrassment in the end.

 

Horrible Words? (Reblog)

This is a very interesting article found and shared by Marian L. Thorpe. As many of you know I love words. I post quite a bit about old and weird words so this article of modern words from A-Z that may be the ruin of the English Language as we know it. I agree that languages are always evolving but at the same time… those words replacing more eloquent language isn’t always the best.

Anyways if you are interested in learning more about this horrible word list check out the link below. 🙂

A link to a timely article for all writers from the Guardian.  I admit to ‘alright’ being one of my pet peeves, but I’ve bowed to common usage in my reviewing and stopped commenting on it. I still wouldn’t write it, though….

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/mar/25/epic-fail-to-hotdesk-guesstimate-an-a-z-of-horrible-words?CMP=fb_gu

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Wonderful Word Wednesday: Whimsical

WHIMSICAL.jpg

I’ve been looking at a lot of classic children’s books recently and one word that continues popping up is whimsical. I love this word because it sounds like a word the suits its definition.

Whimsical basically fanciful or playfully charming in an amusing way. You see the word used in regards to fairytale creatures like imps, elves, or fairies. Magical princess’s may have a whimsical charm too depending on the story.

I enjoy using this word when creating children stories because it is a fun sounding word that is easy to pronounce/ sound out.

Sentences using whimsical:

Mr. Matthew’s wife was a whimsical woman.

or…

The blue fairy danced whimsically around the tree.

Wingdings Font: Why Do We Still Have It?

Second day in a row that I’ve posted a video. I’m not going to say sorry for it because these are interesting/ educational videos which I find interesting.

Ever since I was a kid I was curious about the Wingding font. I used it during my computer classes to send funny messages to friends. I used the font for headers on my short stories and even in my recent published work – Child of the Light. It is a decorative font that we rarely give attention to… so why does Microsoft still have the Wingdings font?

This is a great question, and what better way to answer them than by this short video:

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