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Prophecy Six Blog

Sharing My Unedited Writing Experiences & Life Experiences.

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writing research

Thinking Thursdays: Research & Writing

Hello World Out There World!
This week I’m tackling the question: How important is research to you when writing a book?
I went into some little detail regarding this question on my author interview with Serious Reading a while back but I thought I’d dive in deeper. So, here we go!

Depending on the topic I could spend 10 minutes to 10 weeks researching. When it comes to my blog posts, most of what I write is opinion based and therefore doesn’t have a lot of facts required. Not saying what I’m writing on my blogs I didn’t research… it is just what I’ve written on here is my formulated opinion on the things I’ve read online or formed after having conversations with others interested in these topics.

What I usually spend time researching is what I’ll be using in my books. I want to be able to share correct information with my readers… as I believe if I am going to have people read my work it should be close to accurate as possible. People learn from reading and I don’t want to be sharing the wrong information. At the same time, I am no close to being an expert as Trump is at being a good President. I do not claim to know all the science behind natural health practices. I do not claim to be an expert in medieval history or military tactics. I’ve read books, I’ve made notes and those notes I use in my work. At the same time, I have to trust that the information that I’ve read is correct. For all I know the six books I’ve read could be a creation of someones opinion and not based in fact at all.

That’s one reason why I love writing fictions because as much as I may have truth weaved between the words my writing doesn’t have to be taken as truth. I could include actual ointment recipes or how to make your own tea within the pages of my book but at the same time not be taken completely seriously because of the fact my characters ride magical creatures and shoot lightening bolts from their fingertips, (all right maybe not lightening bolts… but you get the point).

Research is important. Most writers understand and know this. Most writers want to come across as competent in their craft and at times fear about being corrected or called a hack for not getting something right in their books. I know I have the fear and that is why I spend the time exploring the subjects I include in my books I’m not familiar with like naturopathy, botany, and medieval combat. As much as my world is based in fantasy it is my research that helps ground my readers in some kind of twisted, relatable reality.

Am I the only one to think this or are there some writers out there that feel the same way? Am I doing too much research or is this common for writers to feel this way? I’d like to know your opinion on this matter, so don’t be afraid to leave a comment in the area below.
Remember stay safe, be creative and until next time – Toodles! o^.^o

 

 

 

 

Writer Tales: Always Do Your Research (Quote)

Firstly, I love writing quotes. I’ll be the first person to tell you that I get a lot of inspiration from quotes when I’m suffering from writers block or just need a little push. Many of these quotes I’ve shared with you in hopes of helping you feel the same inspiration or motivation to work on your own projects. The thing is, with most of what I put on my blog or website I make sure to research to ensure I am sharing correct information. This is a habit I’ve formed from my teaching days and I’ve only gotten better/ worse (depending on your point of view) since I’ve been researching for my book series.

Today when I was browsing Pinterest one of my suggested pins was a quote with the word HYPERGRAPHIA. I was familiar with this word, since it was in one of my lists somewhere on my computer. So, it was a surprise for me to find that the definition for the word was cut short. Now, this was the pin I had on my front page:

hypergraphia

Beautiful, right? The word that describes the overwhelming urge to write. We’ve all felt this way about writing at least once (or maybe more than once), but there is a problem with this: there is so much more to this word than those pretty four words.

Hypergraphia is an actual symptom for a brain disorder. People suffering from hypergraphia have the urge to write sometime incoherently due to them having epilepsy that causes changes in the temporal lobe. Sometimes those with this symptom will write in amazing detail, beautiful poetry, or utter nonsense. Their styles can change without warning and they won’t stop until the symptom passes or seizure ends.  It isn’t that they want to write but that something in their brain is telling them they have/need to write – even if part of them doesn’t wish to.

I understand that having that as the definition doesn’t get you reposts and people are less likely to like it… the word also doesn’t have that sense of motivation or inspiration as it had moments before but the truth sometimes is better than spreading false or – in this case – limited information. That’s why I edited this quote to add a little more truth to it:

NEWDEFINITIONS

I’m not looking for reposts or repins… I just want to make sure the truth is out there.

I know I’m strange, that hasn’t escaped me. I still find this word fascinating even with this edited definition. I think that has more to due with my passion for psychology and English. The point to this post isn’t that someone decided to post a half-correct definition of a word, but to help you understand that it is up to you to question what you find online to see if it is actually true.

Do your research – it will save you a lot of embarrassment in the end.

 

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